KETR
City Manager Darrek Ferrell, attorney Julia Gannaway and Mayor Wyman Williams presented to attendees at the June 26 meeting.
Mark Haslett

Crews To Resign From Police Department, Move To Administrative Role With City

City of Commerce Chief of Police Kerry Crews will resign and accept an administrative job with the City of Commerce, city officials announced Monday evening.

Read More

88.9 KETR's Summer Fundraising Drive is happening now!

Pitch in your support of public radio and help KETR end the drive early by meeting our $7,500 goal!

Subscribe to KETR's Mailing List

Stay up to date with station news and events!

_

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The historic giant sequoia in Boise, Idaho, towers some 10 stories tall. At more than a century old, it also weighs a hefty 800,000 pounds and measures roughly 20 feet around at its base. Oh, and it had to move a few city blocks.

All of which raised a very good question: How the heck was that going to happen?

Balloons, body paint, joy and mourning — across the world Sunday, Muslims gathered to celebrate the end of the holy month of Ramadan, and the festivities took nearly as many shapes as the places they were held.

An eight-hour cease-fire declared by the Philippine military ended abruptly on Sunday. As soon as the "humanitarian pause" reached its designated end, though, Marawi descended back into the gunfire that has pervaded the southern city for more than a month.

Will arming teachers make schools safer? While that debate continues across the country, this week more than a dozen school employees from around Colorado spent three days learning advanced gun skills at a shooting range outside of Denver.

With 2,500 inmates, the penitentiary institution of Fresnes, about 20 miles south of Paris, is one of the largest prisons in Europe. Like most French prisons, Fresnes is overcrowded. Built in the late 19th century, its tiny cells, each meant for one prisoner, most often house three.

Inmates scream curses and catcalls from their barred windows as I visit a small, empty sports yard ensconced between cell blocks. Plastic bags and punctured soccer balls are caught in the surrounding concertina wire.

Ernest Littlebird put his grill out on the side of Route 39 in Lame Deer, Mont., under the shade of a tree and started grilling hamburgers.

"Come get a dollar burger," he says. "Good meal, you know, something to put in the belly at least."

Littlebird is an entrepreneur. This is his second year selling dollar hamburgers out of his minivan when he couldn't find other work. Jobs are scarce here on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and so is money.

But Littlebird thinks they don't have to be.

The man who fought to make child labor a crime against humanity came to Washington, D.C., last week with a message for America and its new president.

Kailash Satyarthi, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 for his efforts to end child labor, urged U.S. lawmakers to fight for the freedom of 168 million children forced to work due to poverty, trafficking or slavery.

Moments into his highly anticipated on-camera briefing Wednesday — the first after a seven-day absence — Trump press secretary Sean Spicer was asked about the persistent rumor that he will soon transition into a new role within the White House communications team — one that removes him from the spotlight and into a less visible position.

He opted for an indirect response to a very direct question: "I'm still here."

Updated at 8:20 a.m. ET

At least 150 people who had gathered to collect fuel from an overturned tanker truck in Pakistan were killed when it caught fire Sunday, according to The Associated Press.

More than 100 people were injured, many with severe burns.

"Authorities say most of the bodies are burnt beyond recognition and the death toll is likely to rise," reporter Abdul Sattar in Islamabad reports for NPR. "Children and women are among the injured."

Pages