The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Britain's Royals Sue Magazine Over Topless Photos Of Kate Middleton

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge during their visit to Singapore Botanical Gardens on Tuesday.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 2:45 pm

The Brits are in the middle of another scandal involving a semi-nude royal: After issuing a strong condemnation, the royal family said it would sue a French magazine for publishing photos of a topless Duchess of Cambridge.

The Duchess, if you're not a royal watcher, is Kate Middleton, Prince William's wife and ostensible the future queen of England.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Chinese Patrol Boats Stand Down In Islands Row With Japan

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 1:51 pm

A squadron of Chinese patrol vessels has turned back from a tense standoff with the Japanese coast guard near a small group of islands claimed by both countries.

The uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, known to Japan as Senkaku and to China as Diaoyu, have been the subject of a decades-long dispute between Tokyo and Beijing.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

No Deal Yet: Chicago Teachers On Strike For Fifth Day

Chicago public school teachers pose for a photo on a picket line as their strike extends into a fifth day.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 4:41 pm

Update at 3:00 p.m. ET. No Settlement Expected Today:

NPR's Ken Barcus says that no settlement is expected today. The most likely scenario is a contract vote sometime on Sunday, he says.

The Chicago Tribune reports quotes a union attorney who said that the outlines of an agreement are there, but a vote on ending the strike is not likely until Sunday.

Our Original Post Continues:

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
11:54 am
Fri September 14, 2012

It's All Politics, Sept. 13, 2012

Khalil AFP/Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

In an election that's supposed to be about the economy, tragic deaths overseas push foreign policy onto the political stage in the race between Mitt Romney and President Obama. While Romney seems to have lost the initial battle, questions remain about the administration's Middle East goals.

Join NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin for the latest "It's All Politics" roundup.

Shots - Health Blog
11:53 am
Fri September 14, 2012

How's Your Cholesterol? The Crowd Wants To Know

Members of the online community Track Your Plaque get advice from a doctor and each other on how to cook low carb meals.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:33 pm

Our impulse to share intimate details about our lives within our social networks (and even sometimes with complete strangers) seems to know few bounds.

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The Salt
11:03 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Love To Hate Cilantro? It's In Your Genes And Maybe, In Your Head

The very sight of this lacy, green herb can cause some people to scream. The great cilantro debate heats up as scientists start pinpointing cilantrophobe genes.
lion heart vintage Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:45 pm

There's no question that cilantro is a polarizing herb. Some of us heap it onto salsas and soups with gusto while others avoid cilantro because it smells like soap and tastes like crushed bugs.

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Fri September 14, 2012

What Anti-Islam Film Says About Free Speech And The 'Hecklers Veto'

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 12:47 pm

After the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya earlier this week, Google took down the YouTube video said to have sparked the violence — but only in Libya and in Egypt, where anti-American protests also flared up.

It's an example of the challenges of balancing U.S. free speech concerns and of something known as the "heckler's veto."

The Innocence of Muslims isn't the only YouTube video that can be seen in the U.S. but not elsewhere. Nazi propaganda is banned in Germany, for example, and slurs against Turkey's founder don't appear in that country.

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Fri September 14, 2012

University of Texas In Austin Reopens After Bomb-Threat Evacuation

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 1:13 pm

Update at 12:57 p.m. ET. University of Texas Reopens:

The University of Texas has reopened, after a phoned bomb threat prompted the evacuation of its entire Austin campus this morning.

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Health
10:23 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Calling on Uninsured Texans: Free Clinic to Assist Thousands

NAFC

DALLAS - Texas has the highest rate of uninsured people in the country with about 26 percent of residents in general and 22 percent of children lacking health insurance. As it turns out, many of the uninsured aren’t aware of the free and affordable services available to them.

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The Salt
9:10 am
Fri September 14, 2012

How African Cattle Herders Wiped Out An Ancient Plague

Scientist Robert Koch holding a post-mortem on an ox thought to have died of rinderpest, circa 1900.
Reinhold Thiele Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:45 pm

Twice in all of history, humans have managed to eradicate a devastating disease. You've heard of the first one, I suspect: smallpox. But rinderpest?

That's a German word for "cattle plague" a feared companion of cattle throughout history. When outbreaks occurred, as in Europe of the 1700s or Africa in the 1880s, entire herds were wiped out and communities went hungry. Now the disease is gone, eliminated from the face of the earth.

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