Asia
2:34 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Drama Amid Indonesia's Disappearing Mangroves

A man gathering firewood to sell cuts down mangrove trees in the coastal area of Medan city on Indonesia's Sumatra island on Jan. 31. The country, which has one-quarter of the world's mangroves, is losing them at a rate of 6 percent a year. The coastal forests play important ecological and environmental roles.
Suntanta Aditya AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 6:36 am

The rising tide laps at the feet of local children and fishermen and submerges all but the tops of the mangrove trees of Tiwoho village in Indonesia's North Sulawesi province. At one degree of latitude north of the equator, the climate here is about the same all year round: hot, wet and perfect for the forests of salt-tolerant trees that grow along sheltered coastlines.

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Election 2012
2:32 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Romney's Big-Dollar 'Bundlers' Stay Anonymous

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greets supporters in Aston, Pa., on April 23.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 9:07 am

Every presidential nominee going back to 2000 has revealed the names of influential supporters known as "bundlers" because of the way they persuade others to give money to a candidate. Every nominee, that is, until Mitt Romney.

The most anyone can give directly to any presidential campaign is $5,000, and everyone who gives that much is listed in the Romney campaign's monthly disclosures.

When it comes to the bundlers, though, the campaign chooses to keep those names secret.

Voluntary Disclosure

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Education
2:31 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Economy Puts Value Of Liberal Arts Under Scrutiny

Wellesley College English professor Yoon Lee teaches a class on the rise of the novel.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 5:47 am

As high school seniors wrestle with big decisions before Tuesday's deadline about which college they want to go to, some of the nation's top liberal arts colleges are dealing with big decisions of their own. Many of the most elite private schools are trying to figure out how they may have to adapt at a time when they're seen as a more expensive — and less direct — path to landing a job.

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Asia
2:30 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Trade, Security On Agenda For Obama, Japan's Noda

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks during a reception at the Japanese Embassy in Washington on Sunday. Noda meets with President Obama at the White House on Monday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 9:09 am

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda are meeting at the White House on Monday — the first such meeting between U.S. and Japanese leaders in three years.

Political turmoil in Japan has led to a constant turnover in leadership: There have been six prime ministers in as many years.

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Media
4:38 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

If A Fact Dies In The Forest, Will Anyone Believe It?

A recent obituary in the Chicago Tribune mourned the death of facts. But are they truly dead?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 5:04 pm

According to columnist Rex Huppke, there was a recent death that you might have missed. It wasn't an actor, musician or famous politician, but facts.

In a piece for the Chicago Tribune, Huppke says facts – things we know to be true – are now dead.

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Books
4:09 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction Update: Judge's Favorites

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 4:48 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz checks-in with Three-Minute Fiction judge Luis Alberto Urrea to hear how the reading process is going and to hear some of his favorite stories thus far.

The Two-Way
4:09 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

State Of Emergency Raises The Stakes In Sudan

Tensions are rising between Sudan and it's recently-indepedent neighbor, South Sudan.
Adriane Ohanesian AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 5:42 am

Sudan has declared a state of emergency as tensions mount along the disputed border it shares with its new neighbor, South Sudan.

As the AP reports, declaring a state of emergency gives the government expanded powers of arrest. On Saturday, Sudanese officials claimed they had arrested four people, including three foreigners.

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Around the Nation
2:41 pm
Sun April 29, 2012

New Hazard On The Horizon: Amateur Storm Chasers

Emergency responders are running headlong into a growing phenomenon: roads bottled up by swarms of tornado chasers
Matt Piechota YouTube

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 4:48 pm

When more than 100 tornadoes raked the Great Plains a couple of weeks ago, emergency responders ran headlong into a growing phenomenon: roads bottled up by swarms of tornado chasers.

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Music Interviews
9:03 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Marvin Sapp: Surviving Loss, 'Keeping It Moving'

Marvin Sapp's new album is titled I Win.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 4:48 pm

"Never Would Have Made It" is the biggest gospel hit of the past decade, and the man who sings it, Marvin Sapp, is quite possibly the biggest name in gospel today — a development that still surprises the Michigan pastor.

"I'm blown away by how that song has had the impact that it has had on so many people," Sapp tells NPR's Guy Raz. "All of us, I've learned, have gone through 'never would have made it' moments, and that's the reason why I believe that it resonates so strongly in so many people's lives."

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Pop Culture
9:02 am
Sun April 29, 2012

Obama Said WHAT? At The Correspondents' Dinner?

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 11:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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