Education
1:02 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Schools Get Tough With Third-Graders: Read Or Flunk

A student reads at a public elementary charter school in New York City. Educators like to say third grade is when students go from learning to read, to reading to learn.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 5:36 pm

There's little dispute among educators that kids are not reading as well as they should be, but there's endless debate over what to do about it. Now, a growing number of states are taking a hard-line approach through mandatory retentions — meaning third-graders who can't read at grade level will automatically get held back.

To those pushing the idea, it's equal doses of tough and love: You are not doing kids any favors, they say, by waiving them on to fourth grade if they aren't up to snuff on their reading.

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It's All Politics
12:56 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Pollster: Romney Surges Despite More GOP Ohioans Agreeing With Santorum

Mitt Romney greets supporters in Youngstown, Ohio, Monday, March 5, 2012.
Gerald Herbert AP

Suffolk University has a new poll out of Ohio that reminds us that in politics as in life, timing is everything; Rick Santorum would have been much better off if Super Tuesday had been two weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Toola, An Otter Pioneer Who Raised Orphan Pups, Has Died

Toola, the southern sea otter, with a surrogate pup.
Randy Wilder Monterey Bay Aquarium

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:50 pm

Toola may not be a household name, but she made quite an impression on the staff of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, where she lived most of her adult life.

Just look at how Dr. Mike Murray, an aquarium veterinarian, described the sea otter:

"I will argue that there is no other single sea otter that had a greater impact upon the sea otter species, the sea otter programs worldwide, and upon the interface between the sea otters' scientific community and the public."

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Should NFL's Gregg Williams Be Banned, Fined Or Pardoned For Bounties?

Gregg Williams, then the defensive coordinator for the New Orleans Saints, in August 2010.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:22 pm

Gregg Williams, who has spent time as an assistant or head coach at six NFL teams, is meeting with league investigators today to talk about what he's admitted was "a bounty pool of up to $50,000 over the last three seasons that rewarded players with thousand-dollar payoffs for knocking targeted opponents out of games while he was the New Orleans Saints' defensive coordinator," The Associated Press reports.

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The Salt
11:33 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Raw Milk Proponents Don't Trust Health Officials

Raw milk lovers trust the stuff that comes straight from the cow more than they trust the FDA.
iStockPhoto.com

You'd think that scary numbers from the big dogs in infectious disease would be enough to make raw milk drinkers reconsider that choice.

But don't count on it. Just 7 percent of raw milk consumers say they trust health officials' recommendations on what foods are safe to eat, according to a new study.

That means that 93 percent of those folks aren't convinced when health officials say that raw milk products can cause diseases like bovine tuberculosis, Q-fever, and brucellosis, as well as more common food-borne illnesses like Listeria and Salmonella.

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Venezuela's Hugo Chávez Says Tumor Is Cancerous

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez speaking during a TV program in Havana on March 4.
AFP/Getty Images

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez said that the tumor removed by Cuban doctors last week was found to be cancerous.

In remarks televised on Sunday, Chávez also denied rumors that that the cancer had spread to other parts of his body. Bloomberg reports:

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Health
11:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Georgia Lawmaker: Women's Voices Not Being Heard

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 10:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, you've heard the phrase: A mind is terrible thing to waste. That's the longtime slogan of a group that worked to get more African-Americans into college. Well, now a group is saying: Ice time is a terrible thing to waste. There's a new scholarship to try to get more college students of color into hockey. We'll hear more about that in just a few minutes.

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Around the Nation
11:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Blacks, Latinos Mark Civil Rights Milestone

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 10:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Coming up, some advocates for more expansive reproductive rights say women are being disrespected and demeaned by state and national debates about access to abortion and contraception, particularly those debates that include few, if any women. We are going to hear from a female state lawmaker who has flipped the script and crafted legislation focused on the reproductive choices of men. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Mon March 5, 2012

U.S., Israel Stand Together On Iran Issue, Obama And Netanyahu Say

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looked on as President Obama spoke this morning in the Oval Office of the White House.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 8:05 am

With Iran and its nuclear program looming over the discussions, President Obama said this morning that "the United States will always have Israel's back." The president's comment came with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is at the White House for talks today, by his side.

For his part, Netanyahu told reporters that the U.S. and Israel stand together on policy toward Iran, The Associated Press reports.

The two leaders just held something of a photo op. Other reports on what they had to say:

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Media
10:03 am
Mon March 5, 2012

4 Survival Strategies For Struggling Newspapers

A new study suggests ways newspapers can survive in the digital world. Here dead-tree versions of front pages from around the country announce the death of Osama bin Laden in front of the Newseum in Washington on May 2, 2011.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 11:42 am

Newspapers are dying, right?

You probably think so because, for one thing, you're not reading this in a newspaper.

It'd be a reasonable thought. Newspaper readers gradually have been stopping their subscriptions for many years. And the Internet (NPR.org, too) has steadily stolen readers and advertising revenue for the past decade.

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