Art & Design
7:00 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Wal-Mart Heiress' Show Puts A High Price On Art

Alice Walton's long-awaited Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opens Saturday in Arkansas, and the art market is already feeling the impact of the Wal-Mart heiress and the money she's throwing at acquisitions. Not everyone is happy about it. NPR's Joel Rose reports.

Europe
7:00 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Spain Poised For Change As Elections Near

Change is in the wind across southern Europe. The governments of Greece and Italy are collapsing under a mountain of debt and Spain, too, is on shaky financial ground. Spaniards go to the polls on Nov. 20 and are expected to turn the ruling Socialist Party out of power. Yet, as Lauren Frayer reports, people there are also uneasy about the alternatives.

Business
7:00 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Wanted: Temporary Holiday Workers

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 7:41 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Across the country, retailers are accepting applications for temporary positions this holiday season. Seasonal hiring might offer a bit of a break for people looking for work. Scott Detrow of member station WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania has more.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: 18-year-old Tyler Albinus is walking from store to store in a Lancaster, Pennsylvania outlet mall, looking for a job. He's been searching for more than a month now and has lost track of how many applications he's filled out.

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Europe
7:00 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Debt Weighs On European Politics

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 7:41 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Middle East
7:00 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Arab League Suspends Syria; Other Options Unclear

In an emergency meeting on Saturday, the Arab League voted to suspend Syria, warning that the country could face sanctions if it does not end its brutal crackdown on protestors. Meanwhile, NATO leaders say a Libya-style military intervention is out of the question. NPR's Kelly McEvers reports on what other choices remain.

Deceptive Cadence
6:57 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Aaron Copland's Forgotten Score Premieres At Last

Manhattan, Copland's "Quiet City," at night.
Joseph Gareri iStock

American composer Aaron Copland began work on Quiet City in 1939 and completed it two years later. A lonely trumpet and an English horn, backed by hushed strings, offer an ode to New York.

The orchestral version of Quiet City is fairly well known, but there's more to this story. Another version has recently come to light.

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The Record
5:00 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Non-Jamaican Reggae: Who's Making It And Who's Buying It

Hawaiian reggae band The Green. From left to right Zion Thompson, JP Kennedy, Caleb Keolanui and Ikaika Antone.
Tammy Moniz Courtesy of Press Junkie PR

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 7:41 am

Reggae music and the island of Jamaica are inseparable, right? Lately, a crop of artists from places like Hawaii, California and Italy are proving that hit reggae can come from anywhere. In the process, they're raising some complex questions about culture and ownership.

There's a new generation of reggae artists with two things in common: They're not from the birthplace of reggae music, and they are enormously successful.

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Author Interviews
4:36 am
Sat November 12, 2011

'Mrs. Nixon' Reimagines An Enigmatic First Lady

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 7:41 am

Aside from being the wife of one of the most well-known politicians in recent American history, Pat Nixon is mostly a mystery. Throughout crisis and scandal, she somehow managed to remain a private public figure.

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Law
4:05 am
Sat November 12, 2011

Unpaid Interns: Real World Work Or Just Free Labor?

Alex Footman worked as an unpaid intern for the award-winning film Black Swan. He and another former unpaid intern for the movie are suing the film's production company for back pay.
Courtesy of Alex Footman

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 5:20 pm

More than 1 million Americans a year work as interns. About half of them are unpaid.

Alex Footman was among them, until recently. He worked as an unpaid intern for Black Swan, a film that won numerous awards and grossed more than $300 million.

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Middle East
1:46 am
Sat November 12, 2011

In Arab States, It's Good To Be The King

Jordan's King Abdullah II prepares to address parliament on Oct. 26. Like other Arab monarchs, the king has introduced limited changes in response to the uprisings in the Arab world this year.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Three Arab autocrats who ruled their countries for decades have been ousted from power this year, and others are in danger of being overthrown. Yet no king or emir has suffered such a fate.

Protests have taken place in countries ruled by monarchs, including Bahrain, which had widespread demonstrations last spring. And after protests in Morocco and Jordan, the kings offered up limited political changes that have, at least for now, staved off any real threat to their rule.

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