Author Interviews
2:36 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

The Old Man And The Boat: Hemingway On The Pilar

Ernest Hemingway (left) and his guide Carlos Gutierrez navigate Hemingway's boat, Pilar, in 1934.
Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 5:37 pm

In 1934, Ernest Hemingway was the reigning king of American letters. Just back from safari in Africa, where he'd shot rhinos and giant kudu, he seemed to be on top of the world.

The first thing he did after returning from safari was head to the Wheeler shipyard in Brooklyn, N.Y., and buy a 38-foot fishing boat he named Pilar.

Read more
Books
2:00 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction

The Three-Minute Fiction contest is over, but the fun is just beginning. We received 3,400 stories in Round 7 and our readers from Iowa Writer's Workshop and New York University are hard at work trying to get to them of all. NPR's Lynn Neary and Bob Mondello bring two of these stories to life: "Misshapen" by Aaron Maltz and "The Young and the Old" by Alex Swiatek.

Television
1:00 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

TV's Fixation With 'The New Breed' Of '60s Women

The fall television season is in high gear, and there seems to be a barrage of tight skirts, panty-hosed legs and perfectly made-up faces making their way from the 1960s to the small screen.

On ABC is Pan Am, a show about airline stewardesses. There's also NBC's The Playboy Club, which following the stories of fictional bunnies in Hugh Hefner's nightclub. The networks are hoping to get on the nostalgia bandwagon after the success of Mad Men, AMC's period drama.

Read more
Science
12:15 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

When Scientists Fail, It's Time To Call In The Gamers

Proteins are incredibly complex, yet tiny — so tiny that conventional imaging techniques often can't capture them.
istockphoto.com

Researchers at the University of Washington were stumped. They were looking at a protein that causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys, but after 14 years of study, no one was able to figure out the protein's exact structure.

Researcher Firas Khatib tells Rachel Martin, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that even the most advanced imaging techniques couldn't capture this little particle.

"The reason that the problem is so hard is that proteins are so small you can't see them with a microscope," he says.

Read more
Music Lists
8:22 am
Sun October 2, 2011

World Music With A Latin Flavor

The Congolese street band Staff Benda Billi were discovered playing outside a zoo by a group of French filmmakers.
Courtesy of the artist

As he often does during weekends on All Things Considered, Betto Arcos visits the show this week to talk about some of the best new sounds he's been spinning on Global Village, his world music program on KPFK in Los Angeles. His picks this time around include a flamenco-jazz hybrid from Spain, joropo from Colombia, canchona from Washington, D.C. (by way of El Salvador), and a Cuban-inflected dance number from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Read more
Around the Nation
7:06 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Wall Street Protesters Plan Long-Term Occupation

A protester marches on Friday in New York City as part of larger demonstration focused on corporations, wealth and income distribution.
Mario Tama Getty Images

A protest in New York dubbed "Occupy Wall Street" appears to be settling in for the long term. Twice a day, protesters leave the tents, makeshift kitchen and free bookstore set up in Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan and begin a slow march down the sidewalk.

Read more
Politics
7:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Rick Perry Sticks To His Guns On Immigration

Texas governor Rick Perry spent the last two days in New Hampshire, his first visit since the Republican debate in which he defended a Texas law that allows illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition at state colleges. As Jon Greenberg reports, Perry faced headwinds among Republican primary voters.

Politics
7:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Sen. Durbin Defends Reform Despite New Bank Fees

This past week, Bank of America announced plans to charge most of its debit card users $5 a month if they use the card to make purchases. The decision is meant to offset anticipated revenue losses from regulatory changes that took effect on Friday. Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois introduced those changes to last year's Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation. Durbin joins host Audie Cornish to explain why he thinks the legislation is important.

Middle East
7:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Syrian Army Faces Its Own Among Protesters

The Syrian government is continuing its brutal crackdown against protesters. For much of the past week, there have also been clashes between security forces and armed militants in the central town of Rastan and elsewhere. Most of those resisting the government with arms are thought to be defectors from the Syrian army. Host Audie Cornish talks with NPR's Deb Amos from Beirut, where she has been monitoring the Syrian crisis.

Afghanistan
7:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Karzai Breaks Off Talks With The Taliban

In a surprising about-face, Afghan President Hamid Karzai appears to be abandoning his government's long-standing effort to hold peace talks with the Taliban in Pakistan, saying they aren't serious about negotiations. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports.

Pages