Around the Nation
11:16 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Modern Firefighters: Tackling More Than Just Flames

Firefighters of Station 4 in Alexandria, Va.: (left to right) Chief Fire Marshall Robert B. Rodriguez, Jeff Taylor, Capt. Tony Washington, Assistant Chief of Operations Andrew Sneed.
Lily Percy NPR

Fires are on the decline nationwide, but that doesn't make a firefighters job any easier. In fact, it may be harder now. Not only are fires more complicated these days, but the scope of firefighting has changed drastically and now includes fire prevention, public education, safety inspections and more than anything, emergency medical assistance.

"Seventy percent of our calls are medical calls," probational firefighter Jeff Taylor tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan.

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Music Interviews
7:33 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Thomas Dybdahl: Norwegian Invasion

Thomas Dybdahl's first U.S. release, Songs, collects music from the Norweigian songwriter's hit-heavy career overseas.
Kevin Westenberg Courtesy of the artist

In his home country of Norway, Thomas Dybdahl is already a star. The singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has released five well-received albums there over the past decade.

Now, he's making his U.S. debut with Songs, a sort of compilation of the best of his Norwegian hits. One thing that's making the transition easy: His songs are all in English.

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Politics
7:00 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Palin Offers No Clues On Presidential Ambitions

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin offered her supporters no hint of her political plans during a speech Saturday at a Tea Party rally in Iowa.

The atmosphere was that of an end-of-summer county fair. There was plenty of food, lots of T-shirts for sale even some country music. But for the 2,000 or so people gathered on a soggy field in Indianola, south of Des Moines, Palin was the main attraction. It wasnt her first visit to Iowa, home of the nation's first presidential caucus next year.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
6:14 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Ten Years Later, Flight 93 Memorial Still Unfinished

Lloyd Smith, left, and Laura Sprankle of Hagerstown, Md., visit the overlook at the temporary Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pa., Monday, Aug. 1, 2011.
Gene J. Puskar ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sun September 4, 2011 8:58 am

The National Park Service will dedicate a new memorial to the passengers of United Airlines Flight 93 next Saturday, in time for the 10-year anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The airplane crashed outside the town of Shanksville in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decade later, it's the only one of the three major Sept. 11 memorials that has yet to be fully funded.

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Around the Nation
5:30 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Gator Wrestling: 'Not A Thinking Man's Sport'

Jay Young, owner of Colorado Gators, holds Peewee, his 11-year-old daughter's former pet. Colorado Gators offers classes on how to wrestle alligators.
Sean Post

Standing in a pool full of 2-foot-long alligators, Jay Young starts teaching a class on gator wrestling.

"He who hesitates gets bit. Don't think about it," says Young, owner of Colorado Gators. "Alligator wrestling is not a thinking man's sport."

It takes a certain kind of crazy to want to pay $100 to handle animals sensible people run away from. People do sign up, however, ready to try their hands at this most extreme of sports.

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Conflict In Libya
5:07 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Future African Relations Among Uncertainty In Libya

Moammar Gadhafi bankrolled and championed the vision of a United States of Africa, with himself as the continental president. As Libya struggles to find its equilibrium on the cusp of what appears to be the post-Gadhafi era, one question is its future as part of Africa.

The African Union has not officially recognized the rebel leadership in Libya, saying "regime change" and outside intervention were wrong.

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Around the Nation
1:37 am
Sun September 4, 2011

Tropical Storm Lee Reaches Louisiana Coast

The center of Tropical Storm Lee lurched across Louisiana's Gulf Coast early Sunday, dumping torrential rains that threatened flooding in low-lying communities in a foreshadowing of what cities further inland could face in coming days.

At 5 a.m. EDT, Lee had maximum sustained winds of 45 mph, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. It says Lee is crawling to the north at 2 mph. Forecasters say a slow northeastward motion is expected as it treks across southern Louisiana.

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Theater
2:47 pm
Sat September 3, 2011

A Son Confronts Moscone's 'Ghost' On Stage

In Ghost Light, a director deals with his father's death while staging a version of Hamlet.
Jenny Graham Oregon Shakespeare Festival

As the artistic director of the California Shakespeare Theater, Jonathan Moscone has told a lot of stories on stage but never his own father's — until now.

Moscone was 14 when his father, San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, was murdered.

For decades, the younger Moscone saw a legend grow up around city supervisor Harvey Milk, who was also gunned down that day. Milk became a gay rights icon, and his story became the subject of plays, documentaries and films. Moscone's story, however, remained largely untold.

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As NPR's correspondent covering campaign finance and lobbying, Peter Overby totes around a business card that reads Power, Money & Influence Correspondent. Some of his lobbyist sources call it the best job title in Washington.

Overby was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia silver baton for his coverage of the 2000 campaign and the 2001 Senate vote to tighten the rules on campaign finance. The citation said his reporting "set the bar" for the beat.

In 2008, he teamed up with the Center for Investigative Reporting on the Secret Money Project, an extended multimedia investigation of outside-money groups in federal elections.

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