Performing Arts
2:07 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

In Search Of A Stage, Western Opera Singers Try China

Lesson number one: saying "thank you" in Chinese.

"Xie xie. Xie xie. Xie xie," repeats American soprano Maria McDaniel, as she struggles to pin down the elusive Chinese "x" sound.

"Too much lips going on!" is the verdict of her teacher, Katherine Chu, who was an assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Taspinar Discusses Israel-Turkish Relations

The fallout continues from last year's bloody confrontation between troops from the Israel Defense Forces and activists aboard a Turkish aid flotilla bound for the Gaza coast. Robert Siegel speaks with Omer Taspinar, a Turkish scholar who is at the National War College and the Brookings institution.

The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Shootings Leave Several Dead In West Virginia And Nevada

As details come in about a shooting this morning in Carson City, Nev., that authorities are now saying left at least three people dead and at least six others wounded, there's word from West Virginia that as many as five people were shot and killed in Morgantown on Monday.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:35 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Memory Quizzes Still Best For Alzheimer's Diagnosis

PET scans of the brains of a person with normal memory ability and someone diagnosed with Alzheimer's
Image courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

When it comes to predicting whether someone will have Alzheimer's disease, newfangled diagnostic tests for the illness aren't as good as old-fashioned quizzes of thinking and memory.

That's the word from a study that compared different methods for identifying Alzheimer's. The results was just published in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

James Murdoch In Spotlight Again Over His Knowledge Of Phone Hackings

News International executive James Murdoch testified at a parliamentary hearing that he was unaware of a wider problem of cell phone hacking until a lawsuit in 2010.
Warren Allott AFP/Getty Images

Earlier this year, Rupert and James Murdoch told Parliament they didn't realize how deep the phone hacking scandal went in their U.K. tabloid until 2010.

Today, in testimony before Parliament, two of James Murdoch's top executives contradicted him saying they had presented evidence to him much earlier during a meeting that implicated others beyond Clive Goodman, a royal reporter convicted over the practice.

The Guardian reports:

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Music Interviews
12:57 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Zoe Keating: A Symphony Unto Herself

Cellist Zoe Keating in a redwood grove near Occidental, Calif.
Jerry Dodrill

Zoe Keating's latest album is titled Into the Trees, and that's exactly where I have to go to meet her. She lives in the middle of a redwood forest, an hour and a half north of San Francisco. As Keating walks me around, we listen for her neighbors, the woodpeckers, who she says are extra-noisy in the evening.

It's fitting to find Keating in the middle of all this natural noise. In her studio, she creates a similar symphony of sounds, except she does it with just one instrument: her cello.

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Asia
12:25 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

After Nuclear Mishap, Japan Debates Energy Future

Japan faces a dilemma: the country lacks natural resources and relies heavily on nuclear power. But in the wake of the nuclear accident in March, 70 percent of Japanese now say they want to phase out atomic energy.

It's a huge, long-term challenge. Even backers of renewable energy say it could take two generations for Japan to become nuclear free.

But Japan was taking action even before the accident at the Fukushima power plant on the country's northeast coast.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Tue September 6, 2011

Swiss National Bank Takes Aggressive Action, Caps Franc

Swiss francs.
Arnd Wiegmann Reuters

Planet Money's Jacob Goldstein writes that what the Swiss National Bank did today was essentially tell everyone seeking refuge in their currency to, "Go away. Now."

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Tue September 6, 2011

Tracks, Equipment Left By Apollo Missions Visible In New Moon Photos

The Apollo 17 landing site: To the far right, the Lunar Roving Vehicle; Toward the center, the descent stage of the Challenger lunar module. The lines are tracks and cables.
NASA

Tracks and equipment left on the moon by astronauts from three of the Apollo missions can be seen in new photos just released by NASA.

Though not close-ups by any stretch of the imagination, the images do offer more detail than other photos taken two years ago by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which is now circling the moon.

As it flew over landing sites of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 missions, the orbiter snapped pictures that show, among other things:

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Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

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