Business
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Business News

AT&T is trying to convince regulators to approve its $39 billion deal to merge with T-Mobile. Regulators and lawmakers have worried the merger would mean job losses. So the company is promising to bring back 5,000 call center jobs that are now overseas.

Middle East
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Syrian Opposition Names Transition Council

Syria's opposition movement now has a transitional council similar to the one in Libya that's been working to defeat the regime of Moammar Gadhafi. Things aren't going well for the council in Syria, but some say it's a first step toward coordinating the campaign against the Assad regime.

Africa
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

BBC's 'Tripoli Witness' Comes Out Of Hiding

Six months ago, the BBC's reporter in Tripoli went into hiding. Rana Jawad has reported from Libya for the past seven years, but after fears for her safety became too great, she resorted to publishing anonymous reports under the name Tripoli Witness on the BBC website. Now that rebels largely control Tripoli, Jawad has returned to the airwaves. She talked to Steve Inskeep about living undercover.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Dominion Linemen Risk Danger To Restore Power

Hurricane Irene left millions of people up and down the East Coast without electricity. Power companies say it could be a week before service is restored everywhere. At Dominion Power in Virginia, repair teams are working 16 hour shifts.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Exxon Enters Lucrative Arctic Deal With Russia

Russia and Exxon have reached an agreement that opens the way for oil exploration in the Russian sector of the Arctic Ocean. And it allows the Russians access to projects in other parts of the world, including the United States. David Greene talks to journalist Julia Ioffe, who's covering the story in Moscow.

Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.

In his current role, Bowman has traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan often for month-long visits and embedded with U.S. Marines and soldiers.

Before coming to NPR in April 2006, Bowman spent nine years as a Pentagon reporter at The Baltimore Sun. Altogether he was at The Sun for nearly two decades, covering the Maryland Statehouse, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the National Security Agency (NSA). His coverage of racial and gender discrimination at NSA led to a Pentagon investigation in 1994.

Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

Writer and commentator Frank Deford is the author of sixteen books. His latest novel, Bliss, Remembered, is a love story set at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and in World War II. Publishers Weekly calls it a "thought-provoking...and poignant story, utterly charming and enjoyable." Booklist says Bliss, Remembered is "beautifully written...elegantly constructed...writing that is genuinely inspiring."

On radio, Deford may be heard as a commentator every Wednesday on NPR's Morning Edition and, on television, he is the senior correspondent on the HBO show RealSports With Bryant Gumbel. In magazines, he is Senior Contributing Writer at Sports Illustrated.

Your Money
11:01 pm
Tue August 30, 2011

A Push To Curb Auto Service Contract Scams

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 31, 2011 11:01 pm

You've likely seen the commercials for vehicle service contracts on TV promising to save customers thousands of dollars in repairs to their older cars and trucks.

And St. Louis is like the Silicon Valley of those vehicle service contract companies. But while the industry continues to thrive, Missouri's Better Business Bureau logged almost 1,000 complaints about it last year alone.

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