Politics
2:00 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Journalist Explores Perry's Electoral Successes

Scientists analyze patterns in all areas of life, from weather to health, to help predict outcomes. Journalist Sasha Issenberg examines how political scientists employed by the Texas gubernatorial campaign of Rick Perry in 2006 helped him strategize through testing random samples of voters. Robert Siegel talks with Issenberg about this approach — and how it shaped Perry's subsequent campaigns.

Sports
2:00 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Australian Wins Surfing Competition

Australian Owen Wright won the first pro-surfing competition held in New York. Wright beat out Kelly Slater, a ten-time world champion surfer, for the $300,000 prize.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

How One Mistake Can Leave Millions Without Power

San Diego's power company has restored power to all of its customers. Thursday afternoon, more than 4 million people in the Southwestern U.S. and parts of Mexico lost electricity. Arizona Public Service Company says the outage occurred after an electrical worker mistakenly removed a piece of monitoring equipment at a substation in southwest Arizona.

Economy
2:00 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Obama's Jobs Plan Versus GOP Rivals' Plans

President Obama and two of his GOP opponents in next year's election have laid out their ideas to turn the economy around. NPR's Scott Horsley joins Robert Siegel to compare and contrast the plans.

Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:28 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

In The Thick Of It: Sept. 11 From The Middle East

A Pakistani security guard sits on a chair amid the wreckage of the Marriott Hotel in Islamabad on Sept. 22, 2008, two days after a suicide bombing at the hotel.
Pedro Ugarte AFP/Getty Images

Michael Sullivan has covered foreign affairs for NPR, including earthquakes in India, Pakistan and Japan, volcanoes in Indonesia, and has been kidnapped by Somalis, Afghans, Haitians and the Tajik KGB.

On Sept. 11, I was in Islamabad. At the Marriott. Eating dinner in my hotel room while watching the news on CNN.

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Music Interviews
12:52 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Beirut: A Jet-Setter Settles Down

Beirut's latest album is The Rip Tide. Zach Condon, the band's leader, says the title was inspired by a real-life brush with a life-threatening ocean wave.
Kristianna Smith

Zach Condon says he was half-joking when he named his band Beirut: "I was kind of poking fun at myself," he says with a chuckle, "and some of my more exotic tastes in music at the time."

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Nuclear Regulatory Commission OKs Closure Of Yucca Mountain

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission handed down a long awaited decision today that allows the Obama administration to continue its plans to close Yucca Mountain, the nuclear waste dump in Nevada.

The AP reports:

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KETR Local
12:12 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Pregame activities include salute to local heroes


Commerce – With the 10th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks just a couple of days away, area school districts are planning Friday evening to honor emergency responders.

At Memorial Stadium in Commerce, the Commerce ISD, in cooperation with Princeton ISD, would like to recognize "Local Heroes". Area firefighters, police officers and military, retired, reserve or active, are asked to meet on the track behind the Commerce team bench (east side) at 7:00 pm.

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Fri September 9, 2011

Report: U.K. Police Protected Gadhafi's Son From Assassination Plot In 2004

This morning The Guardian has a report about a 2004 incident concerning one of Moammar Gadhafi's most prominent children. Based on documents the paper found in Gadhafi's compound in Libya, The Guardian reports that in 2004, the United Kingdom offered Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi protection after the government uncovered an assassination plot.

The Guardian reports:

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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Fri September 9, 2011

Why Are Feet Washing Ashore In Washington?

One of the creepier stories in recent weeks has been about feet found along the shores of Washington state and British Columbia. There have been 11 or so discovered since 2007 — usually in athletic shoes.

Jake Ellison at NPR member station KPLU set out to see if he could figure out what's going on, and starts his report with this attention-getting line:

"There are likely hundreds of dead human bodies in the waters of the Northwest at any given time."

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