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5:22 am
Sat April 21, 2012

Amid Europe's Debt Crisis, A Sharp Rise In Suicides

Mourners gather at the spot in front of the Greek parliament in Athens where 77-year-old retired pharmacist Dimitris Christoulas shot and killed himself on April 4. Christoulas left a note saying he did not want to end up scrounging for food in garbage bins.
Simela Pantzartzi EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 7:47 pm

The eurozone crisis has been under way for three years and has led to sharp welfare cutbacks and a credit crunch throughout the continent.

But one of the most serious effects of the financial crisis has been an alarming spike in suicides in debt-burdened Greece, Ireland and Italy.

Last Wednesday, about a 1,000 people gathered in central Rome for a candle-lit vigil to honor Italy's economic victims. Statics show that from 2009 and 2010, some 400 small-business owners took their lives.

There have already been 23 crisis-related suicides since January.

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The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Three More Secret Service Employees Resign Over Prostitution Scandal

Update at 6:19 p.m. ET. Three Secret Service Agents Step Down:

The Secret Service confirmed that three "additional employees have chosen to resign" and a twelfth employee has been implicated.

"At this point, five employees continue to be on administrative leave and their security clearances remain suspended pending the outcome of this investigation," the agency said in a press release.

The three dismissals today brings the total number of agents forced out of the agency because of the scandal to six.

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The Disappearing Coast
5:06 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Two Years Later, BP Spill Reminders Litter Gulf Coast

Pictured here on April 13, 2011, Barataria Bay — part of Louisiana's Barataria Basin — was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion. Today, obvious signs of the spill have faded, but communities are still reeling from its effects.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:17 pm

It's been two years since the Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 rig workers and unleashing the worst oil spill in U.S. history. The oil has long stopped flowing and BP spent billions of dollars to clean up oiled beaches and waterways, but the disaster isn't necessarily over.

Oil fouled some 1,100 miles of Gulf Coast shoreline, but today, in most spots, you can't see obvious signs of the spill. In Orange Beach, Ala., the clear emerald waters of the Gulf roll onto sugar-white sand beaches.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:49 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Couples Should Get Tested For HIV Together, WHO Says

What do you say we go get HIV tested together?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:05 am

The World Health Organization is telling couples around the world to get tested together to see if either is infected with HIV.

If one of them is, that partner should start treatment with anti-HIV drugs – even if it's not yet medically necessary.

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It's All Politics
3:43 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Presidential Fundraising Numbers Poised To Skyrocket

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:11 pm

The latest financial numbers are coming out Friday from the campaigns of President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney — along with the superPACs that love them.

First, the easy numbers: $53 million was raised in March to re-elect Obama and $12.6 million was raised by the Romney campaign to win the Republican primaries.

But those easy numbers don't give a complete picture.

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'Radio Diaries'
3:43 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter

White Citizens' Council leader Asa Earl Carter denounces school integration in Clinton, Tenn., on Aug. 31, 1956.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:11 pm

In the early 1990s, The Education of Little Tree became a publishing phenomenon. It told the story of an orphan growing up and learning the wisdom of his Native American ancestors, Cherokee Texan author Forrest Carter's purported autobiography.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

In First Test For Racial Justice Act, Judge Commutes Man's Death Sentence

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 3:31 pm

A North Carolina judge commuted the death sentence of convicted murderer Marcus Robinson saying racial bias tainted his trial and sentencing. Instead, Robinson will serve life in prison.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

To Russia, With Musical Love — After 22 Years' Absence

An advertisement in Moscow for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's first concerts in Russia in more than two decades.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

This week, music is bringing Americans and Russians together in a way that policy discussions never can. And don't call that a cliche in front of the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

If U.S. relations with Russia have hit a sticky patch over Syria and other issues lately, that didn't stop the Chicago Symphony from thrilling a Russian audience this past Wednesday night, just as it did on its last visit — to the then-Soviet Union in 1990.

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Politics
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Bill Could Complicate U.S.-Russia Relations

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

Bipartisanship is rare on Capitol Hill these days but one bill is gaining support from both Republicans and Democrats. There's a problem, though, the Obama administration is leery of it.

As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, the bill involves human rights abuses in Russia. And U.S. diplomats are worried it could complicate relations at a time when the U.S. needs Russia's backing on a range of issues.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Frozen Cows Present Dilemma In Rockies

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The U.S. Forest Service has a cow problem: six dead cows. They were discovered inside a cabin, piled up and frozen solid in the Colorado backcountry. The cabin is at Conundrum Hot Springs at 11,200 feet, accessible only by a precipitous hike. And rangers are trying to figure out how to get rid of the carcasses before they decompose.

Scott Snelson is district ranger for the Aspen-Sopris District at the White River National Forest where the cows were found. And he joins me now.

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