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Economy
1:33 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Corporate Taxes: How Low Can You Go?

Google's Netherlands Office has an indoor bike lane.
Google Press

The idea that America's 35 percent corporate tax rate is stifling U.S. economic growth is almost an article of faith among some politicians.

The sound bites from Republican presidential debates to campaign stops are basically interchangeable: "We need to bring that corporate tax rate down."

But in fact, very few corporations pay taxes on 35 percent of their profits. With the help of complex international tax loopholes, some companies manage to pay almost no corporate tax at all.

'Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich'

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
1:32 pm
Sat September 10, 2011

Bush Aide Feith: 2 Of 3 Anti-Terror Goals Were Met

Doug Feith served four years in the George W. Bush administration as Donald Rumsfeld's undersecretary of defense for policy. He is now a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute.
Courtesy of Doug Feith

Originally published on Sat September 10, 2011 5:40 pm

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, reshaped the U.S. foreign policy agenda, says Doug Feith, who was undersecretary of defense for policy in the Bush administration.

He sees the top two goals of that new agenda as achieved: preventing future attacks and disrupting terror networks. But he says the U.S. failed on the other goal: countering ideological support for terrorism.

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Afghanistan
5:16 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Pakistan Could Be Vital To 'Afghan-Led' Peace Process

Pfc. Natan Martinez fires a machine gun from a position near the Pakistan border in Afghanistan. There is concern in Pakistan about the U.S. preserving a security presence in Afghanistan beyond 2014, the deadline to pull out most if not all U.S. combat troops.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 12:05 pm

An end to the war in Afghanistan is slowly beginning to come into view, 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. Few countries have been as deeply affected by the decade of fighting as Pakistan.

Since 2001, Islamist extremism fueled by the Afghan conflict has claimed the lives of 35,000 Pakistanis — 30,000 of them civilians.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
5:06 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Tennessee Town Grapples With Sept. 11 Legacy

Hundreds of men pray at the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tenn. The congregation wants to build a new, bigger place to worship, but has faced stiff opposition from citizens who fear the local Muslims have a political agenda. Imam Ossama Bahloul says it's nonsense to think the congregation is a threat.
Debbie Elliott

In Murfreesboro, Tenn., more than 5,000 people are expected Sunday for the annual Sept. 11 memorial. What started as a small flag ceremony at the Rutherford County's Sheriff's Department 10 years ago is now a major community event. Murfreesboro has been dealing with another legacy of the attacks, which is playing out in a controversy over a mosque.

A Local Response To The Trauma

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
5:03 am
Sat September 10, 2011

With TSA, Are We Safer Or Sorry?

At the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, a small temporary exhibit marks Sept. 11, 2001. Along with artifacts found in the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — like a smashed firetruck door and twisted bits of fuselage — is a bin filled with every imaginable object people have tried to carry on airplanes.

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Science
4:34 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Thirsty Birds 'Burn the Engine' In Flight

A Swainson's thrush flies a mock-migration in the wind tunnel at the University of Western Ontario.
Science AAAS

Migratory songbirds like Swainson's thrushes spend their winters in South and Central America. But as spring approaches, they fly thousands of miles north to Canada.

Along the way, these little birds show endurance that would shame even the toughest athletes. They can fly for up to eight hours straight without stopping for food or water.

Scientists know how birds cope without food during the flights: They burn fat. But until now, they haven't figured out the water question. How do migrating birds avoid dehydration after all that flying?

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Politics
4:20 am
Sat September 10, 2011

Obama Launches Aggressive Push For Jobs Plan

President Obama speaks about his new jobs proposal at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va., on Friday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

President Obama is selling his jobs plan as a much-needed shot in the arm for a still struggling economy. It includes new public works projects, help for local school districts, training opportunities for those who have been out of work a long time, and more than $200 billion in tax cuts for workers and the companies that hire them.

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Three-Minute Fiction
11:01 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction Round 7: Arriving And Leaving

Danielle Evans is the author of "Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self."
Nina Subin

Weekends on All Things Considered has received hundreds of letters and posts on our Three-Minute Fiction Facebook page asking — actually demanding — the return of our fiction contest. So here it is: the beginning of Round 7 of Three-Minute Fiction.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
5:18 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

New York City Beefs Up Security Ahead Of Sept. 11

Police officers watch travelers at the entrance of the Grand Central subway terminal in New York on Thursday. Security measures around the city were increased two days before the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

New York City was on high alert this week, even before Thursday night's announcement that there was a "credible but unconfirmed" terrorist threat to New York and Washington, D.C. Newspaper headlines screamed about a city on lockdown.

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The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Report: 160,000 Deported Without Facing Judge

Over the course of seven years, 160,000 immigrants have been deported without ever facing a judge, a new report reveals. Issued by the National Immigration Law Center, the report charges that the U.S. has used something called "stipulated removal" to strong arm immigrants into signing away their due process.

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Business
4:39 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Earlier Stimulus Offers Lessons For A Second Round

President Obama called on legislators on Thursday to pass his American Jobs Act, which proposes billions of dollars in new spending on infrastructure.

"Building a world-class transportation system is part of what made us an economic superpower," Obama told a joint session of Congress.

It's difficult to say exactly how much additional infrastructure spending would take place if the president's plan is approved by Congress. But experts say examining how — and if — previous stimulus projects created jobs can help maximize results for this round.

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The Picture Show
4:31 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

For Veterans, The Tough Climb Back To Civilian Life

Iraq War veteran Tyler Daly goes rock climbing in Colorado.
David Gilkey NPR

The lasting legacies of Sept. 11 are numerous — sometimes elusive. There's the altered New York City skyline and the ongoing war. There also are wounded soldiers coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan each year to face a new battle: Fitting back into civilian life.

Rehabilitation programs exist for those returning with physical wound, but little support exists for those with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:53 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Babesia In The Blood? There Should Be A Test For That

Deer ticks like this one can spread a parasite that causes babesiosis. And infected people can spread it through blood donations.
Jim Gathany CDC

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 1:37 pm

Nobody likes ticks. Well, maybe some scientists who study them do. But civilians and people concerned with public health really are not fans.

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House & Senate Races
3:50 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Republican Now Leads In Race To Replace Weiner

Rep. Anthony Weiner announced his resignation on June 16. With just days to go before the special election, the Republican candidate is running neck-and-neck in a heavily Democratic district.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

It's been more than two months since former New York Congressman Anthony Weiner resigned in disgrace after sending lewd messages on the internet and then lying about it. But now the race to fill his seat in Queens and Brooklyn is causing more headaches for Democrats.

With just days to go before a special election, a Siena College poll taken this week showed the Republican candidate with a six-point advantage in a heavily Democratic district.

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

The Day Before America Was Interrupted: Nine People Recall Sept. 10, 2001

Rick King, who was assistant fire chief of Shanksville, Pa., on Sept. 11, 2001, stands near a cross made from steel from the World Trade Center, outside the fire station in Shanksville on July 14. He was one of nine people to tell NPR what Sept. 10 was like, the day before the horrible events of Sept. 11.
Gene J. Puskar AP

When Americans are asked what Sept. 10, 2001, was like, many call that Monday "normal" or "ordinary."

"Just a normal summer day," one man said.

That all changed on Sept. 11.

Nine individuals told All Things Considered where they were on Sept. 10. They talked about some of their serendipitous experiences, near misses or devastating turn of events of that day — the day before America was interrupted.

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