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2:03 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Some Immigrant Students Still Dreaming Of Clarity

Jovanna Hernandez carries a sign in support of young illegal immigrants during a protest march, which concluded in front of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Philadelphia in March.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 6:17 am

One question left unanswered by President Obama's announcement last week that he would stop deportations of some young illegal immigrants was what the policy change will mean for students.

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All Tech Considered
2:02 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Your New Digital Wallet: In The Cloud But Still Tethered To Fees

David Marcus, president of PayPal, unveils PayPal Here in San Francisco in March. The service allows customers to use their smartphones to pay for purchases at retail stores.
Kim White AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 3:38 pm

Tech companies from Seattle to Silicon Valley, intent on transforming how we shop, have set their sights on the electronic payments industry.

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All Tech Considered
2:01 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Tesla's New Electric Sedan: Five Passengers, 89 MPG, And No Engine

The new Model S from Tesla has a maximum range of 265 miles with a full charge. The car can also reach 60 miles per hour in 4.4 seconds — a feat the company says may affect overall mileage.
Bill Chappell NPR

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 9:46 am

The Tesla electric car company has high hopes for its new Model S, which it calls "the world's first premium electric sedan." The new car, which is being delivered to customers Friday, is priced at around half the cost of the only other Tesla model, the svelte, two-door Roadster.

The new car's sticker price starts around $57,000; a $7,500 federal tax credit drops the starting price just below $50,000. But like its gas-powered cousins, this electric vehicle has so many options available that its price can soar to near $100,000.

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StoryCorps
9:03 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Serving In Silence, Before 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

Denny Meyer spoke about serving in the Navy as a gay man at StoryCorps in New York City.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 7:40 am

This weekend, gay pride celebrations will mark the first year since the repeal of "don't ask, don't tell," the law that banned gays from serving openly in the U.S. military.

Denny Meyer, 65, is a veteran who served in the Navy during the Vietnam War. During a recent visit to StoryCorps, he remembered what it was like to be both gay and a sailor in the late 1960s.

"In those days, we served in silence. And not one day passed when you didn't worry that you were going to be found out," he says.

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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

From Our Readers: TV? What TV?

Our piece about a Supreme Court's decision to dismiss fines against ABC and Fox, led to comments from households that have greatly reduced their television intake. Of course, most acknowledged the obvious — they're still on the internet (hardly a space known for its sterling regulation of decency), and did we detect a little of one-up-manship?

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Moody's Downgrades 15 Major Global Banks, Including BofA, JPMorgan Chase

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 5:53 pm

The credit rating agency Moody's Investor Services just downgraded the ratings of 15 of the world's largest banks.

Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs were among them.

The AP reports:

"The ratings agency said late Thursday that the banks were downgraded because their long-term prospects for profitability and growth are shrinking.

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It's All Politics
5:13 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

New SuperPAC Financial Reports Reveal More Big Spenders

The political fundraising numbers filed this week are revealing a new crop of million-dollar donors.

Cash flowed into the superPACs supporting President Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney last month. Priorities USA Action, the pro-Obama superPAC, got $4 million, while the pro-Romney equivalent, Restore Our Future, pulled in $5 million.

So who are the big spenders?

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The Two-Way
4:53 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Sandusky's Adopted Son Claims He Was An Abuse Victim, Too

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 7:03 pm

A lawyer for Jerry Sandusky's adopted son says Matthew Sandusky was also a victim of the former Penn State assistant football coach.

In a statement released by Andrew Shubin, Matthew Sandusky said he was prepared to testify against his father.

The Patriot-News first broke the story and Shubin confirmed his statement to NPR.

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Around the Nation
4:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

A Fight To The Finish For Tennessee Mosque

Construction workers pack up at the end of their workday at the Islamic Center in Murfreesboro, Tenn.
Mark Humphrey AP

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 9:34 pm

The first minarets in Murfreesboro, Tenn., are about to be placed atop a new mosque. But when construction is complete on the new Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, located about 30 miles southeast of Nashville, no one will get to move in.

An ongoing court battle has stalled the project, one of several Islamic centers around the country that, like the so-called ground zero mosque, have encountered resistance from local communities.

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Education
4:19 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Kids Get Hands-On With Science In A 'Dream Garage'

Community Science Workshops give low-income kids around California opportunities to learn about science firsthand — from holding spiders to building robots.
Amy Standen for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 8:09 am

Many kids who grow up in big cities have lots of opportunities to experience science hands-on. There are zoos, museums, planetariums and school field trips.

But those amenities are sometimes out of reach for lower-income children. And in some rural areas, those opportunities simply don't exist at all.

In California — as in many states — public school science programs have faced deep budget cuts. Many kids have been left behind.

Dan Sudran has taken it upon himself to help close the gap.

Instilling A Love Of Science, Early On

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