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Afghanistan
1:34 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

In Battle For Hearts And Minds, Taliban Turn To CDs

When the Taliban controlled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001, their hard-line policies included a ban on music tapes and videos.

Yet now, the Taliban are producing their own CDs in an attempt to win the hearts and minds of Afghans.

In bustling downtown Kabul, Mustafa, 22, works in an electronics store selling music CDs to 20-something customers.

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It's All Politics
1:28 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Candidates' Stance On Immigration Scrutinized Ahead Of Florida Primary

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney campaigns in Tampa, Fla., on Monday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 5:44 am

The issue of immigration, which barely simmered during the first three Republican presidential contests, could reach a boil now that the candidates have arrived in Florida for the state's Jan. 31 primary.

Florida, with its large and influential Latino population, provides the earliest gauge of the difficulty facing any eventual GOP nominee in courting Hispanic voters, who increasingly view Republicans' rhetoric about immigration as anti-Hispanic.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

A Year After The Shooting, Giffords Completes Unfinished Business

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords hugs Daniel Hernandez, the former intern who helped save her life.
Facebook.com

Life came full circle for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords today. A little more than a year after she was shot in the head at a community meet-and-greet she organized, she met with others who survived the rampage.

At her office in Tucson, the Arizona congresswoman met with Daniel Hernandez, her former intern who is credited with helping to save her life by containing her bleeding.

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National Security
1:19 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

In Afghan War, U.S. Prepares To Redefine The Mission

The U.S. military wants Afghan troops to begin taking the lead role in combat operations. Here, Afghan cadets who are joining the army are shown at their graduation ceremony on Dec. 18 in the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif.
Qais Usyan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 7:03 am

American commanders in Afghanistan are preparing for a major shift in their mission this year.

U.S. troops are expected to move away from their lead role in combat operations in most areas. Instead, they'll advise Afghan forces to take the lead in both operations and security duties throughout much of Afghanistan.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Jewel (The Bear) Gives Birth To (At Least) Two Cubs

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Music Interviews
10:49 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Winter Songs: Tap Dancing To 'Sixteen Tons' On The Hood

In rural Minnesota, listener Veronica Horton made her own fun by dancing to "Tennessee" Ernie Ford's classic song on an old car.
Roman Krochuk iStockphoto.com

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Shots - Health Blog
10:46 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Stem Cells Show Promise As Blindness Treatment In Early Study

Sue Freeman, 78, checks her e-mail at her home in Laguna Beach, Calif., on Saturday. An experimental stem-cell procedure last July led to a marked improvement in her eyesight.
Melissa Forsyth for NPR

Two women losing their sight to progressive forms of blindness may have regained some vision while participating in an experiment testing a treatment made from human embryonic stem cells, researchers reported today.

The report marks the first time that scientists have produced direct evidence that human embryonic stem cells may have helped a patient. The cells had only previously been tested in the laboratory or in animals.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant For GPS Tracking

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case about whether GPS monitoring devices like this one may be affixed to suspects' cars without a warrant from a judge.
Yasir Afifi AP

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 1:26 pm

The Supreme Court has just ruled that police need a warrant if they want to place a tracking device on a suspect's vehicle. The court's decision was unanimous.

NPR's Nina Totenberg says that this debate has been a contentious issue in the digital age. Here's how she explained it to newscaster Paul Brown:

At issue here is the case of Antoine Jones, a Washington, D.C. night club owner. Police put a GPS tracking device on his car for 30 days. That helped authorities find a stash of money and drugs.

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The Salt
10:09 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Geoengineered Food? Climate Fix Could Boost Crop Yields, But With Risks

Altering the upper atmosphere could block enough sunlight to offset the warming effects of climate change and protect food crops. But what are the risks?
iStockphoto

For a few years now, a handful of scientists have been proposing grandiose technological fixes for the world's climate to combat the effects of global warming — schemes called geoengineering.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:08 am
Mon January 23, 2012

A Permanent Home That Allows Drinking Helps Homeless Drink Less

The 1811 Eastlake apartment building in Seattle houses homeless alcoholics without requiring them to stop drinking.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 10:09 am

Most housing set up to help the homeless comes with a strict no-booze policy.

But a study on a controversial complex in Seattle that allows chronic alcoholics to keep drinking suggests the lenient approach can work too.

Homeless people with alcohol problems decreased their consumption over two years at the facility, called 1811 Eastlake. The average amount of alcohol consumed on a typical drinking day by the 95 study participants had decreased by about 25 percent at the end of the two-year study.

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