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2:59 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

As Occupy Camps Close, What's Next For Movement?

Occupy Wall Street protesters regroup in Foley Square after New York City police in riot gear removed the protesters from Zuccotti Park early Tuesday. The evacuation followed similar moves in Oakland, Calif., and Portland, Ore.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 10:09 am

As pressure mounts in cities across the country to evict Occupy protesters from parks and squares, the movement's supporters face a decision about what to do next.

After months-long sit-ins that have brought international attention to the movement's demand for greater economic equality, as well as occasional clashes between demonstrators and police, cities in recent days have moved in force to end the protests.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:55 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

The Pill: Not Just For Pregnancy Prevention

iStockphoto.com

Well, here's another twist in the debate over whether birth control is an essential health benefit. More than 1.5 million American women use birth control pills for reasons other than preventing pregnancy, a new analysis finds.

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Business
2:35 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

NYC Taxi Medallions Fetch 'Unbelievable' Returns

A New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission medallion adorns the hood of a taxi. The value of a medallion has increased 1,000 percent since 1980.
Chip East Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 5:50 pm

It's been a bumpy ride these past few years for investors looking for easy ways to make money. Stocks, bonds and real estate have all seen wild swings or simply delivered disappointing results.

But a taxi medallion is one investment that keeps going up in value: Two of them recently sold for a record $1 million each.

A taxi medallion gives the bearer the right to pick up rides for hire. It turns out it's also a great investment vehicle. When New York cab driver Sushil Maggoo bought his in 2003, for example, he paid around $215,000.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Is Lying On The Internet Illegal?

A screen shot of Facebook's terms of service.
Facebook

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 2:52 pm

Today, a subcommittee of the Committee On The Judiciary heard some fascinating testimony about the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). (We know what that sounds like, but bear with us.)

The hearing, titled "Cyber Security: Protecting America's New Frontier," really focused on big cyber threats to the country's infrastructure, but there was another juicier question that came out of the hearing: The way the Justice Department wants to interpret a current law, lying on the Internet would amount to a crime.

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Middle East
2:14 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Islamist Parties Proliferate In Post-Mubarak Egypt

Demonstrators from a Salafi group chant slogans and hold posters that read, in Arabic, "Islamic Egypt," during a Sept. 23 protest against emergency law in Cairo. Salafi political parties will be among those vying in upcoming elections.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 7:34 pm

Egypt holds parliamentary elections this month and many people expect the outcome to be similar to recent polls in Tunisia, where an Islamist party won the largest bloc of seats.

Nearly a dozen official parties with ties to Islamist groups have sprung up in Egypt since the summer, and most analysts predict they will do well.

Gamal Ashry is one parliamentary candidate. He's with the Freedom and Justice Party, the political offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Arab world's largest and oldest Islamist movement.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Panetta Addresses Iraq Troop Withdrawal

Top Pentagon leaders went to Capitol Hill Tuesday and took tough questions from lawmakers on the future of the U.S. relationship with Iraq. Specifically, they addressed how the decision to withdraw all U.S. combat troops by the end of this year will impact Iraq's stability and U.S. national security interests in the region. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta told a congressional committee that, while U.S. military commanders wanted to keep a contingency force on the ground, it was Iraq's decision to make.

Energy
2:00 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Chu Discusses Solyndra Controversy

On Thursday, Energy Secretary Steven Chu will answer congressional questioning over the handling of a large federal loan guarantee made to the solar energy company Solyndra. The California-based company was to be the first of many American green technology innovators to receive support from the U.S. government. Two years later, Solyndra went belly-up. Melissa Block speaks with Chu about the scrutiny he is now facing over his support of the company.

The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

The Citadel Faces Abuse Scandal Similar To Penn State's

Note: There are some details of alleged sexual activity with minors in this post.

There's a story unfolding in Charleston, S.C., that sounds depressingly similar to the scandal that has rocked Penn State University.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

The Occupy Movement And The First Amendment: 'A Classic Collision'

NYPD officers pull down signage as they clear out Occupy Wall Street activists from a private park next to Duarte Square in New York City.
Preston Rescigno Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 12:34 pm

When New York Police moved to dismantle the Occupy Wall Street encampment at Zuccotti Park in the pre-dawn hours, one of the first questions aired on the Web was, "What about the First Amendment?"

Juan Cole, a professor of history at the University of Michigan, quickly penned a blog post, concluding:

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Author Interviews
11:18 am
Tue November 15, 2011

Mark Kelly Tells Of Giffords' 'Courage' In Recovery

Mark Kelly has a new book about his wife, Rep. Gabby Giffords, and her road to recovery since she was shot in the head on Jan. 8.
Courtesy of P.K. Weis

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 7:35 pm

Earlier this year, on Jan. 8, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) was shot in the head as she met with constituents in Tucson, Ariz. She was one of 13 people injured that day. Six people were killed.

It had been four years since Giffords arrived in Washington as a wide-eyed freshman and told NPR: "Life's good and [I'm] very, very excited — so optimistic about taking our country in a new direction."

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