Allison Aubrey

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

In 2009, Aubrey was awarded both the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for PBS' NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor's of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master's of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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The Salt
1:08 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Heritage Turkeys: To Save Them, We Must Eat Them

Narragansett and Standard Bronze heritage breed turkeys browse at a farm in Westport, Mass.
Stephan Savoia AP

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 9:49 pm

A decade ago there were fewer than 100 Narragansett turkeys being raised on a few hobby farms. The gamy-tasting meat has a flavor that most Americans have never tasted. "They're delicious," says Slow Food USA's Josh Viertel.

"And they're at risk of being gone forever."

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The Salt
5:49 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Pizza As A Vegetable? It Depends On the Sauce

Pizza for sale at a Chicago public school. Under a House spending bill, this would still count as a vegetable serving — without extra sauce.
Tim Boyle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 12:06 pm

When it comes to the politics of school lunch programs, the easy part is agreeing that kids should be eating more fruits and vegetables.

The hard part? Determining what counts as a vegetable. Take, for instance, the tomato sauce on pizza. As part of new nutrition standards proposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, schools would need to use about one-half cup of tomato paste on pizza in order for the sauce to count as a vegetable serving.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Lawmakers Consider Counting Pizza As a Veggie

Lawmakers say pizza and french fries deserve to keep their place in school cafeterias. New nutrition standards aimed at putting more fresh and healthy food in front of kids are being revised in a current House agriculture appropriations bill. The latest version says the tomato sauce on a slice of pizza is the equivalent of a vegetable. Critics are likening it to the "ketchup-as-a-vegetable-controversy" during the Reagan administration.

Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Second Thoughts On Pills For Babies Who Spit Up

Babies have been crying and spitting up since time immemorial. But these days many parents ask: Isn't there a drug for that?

"Parents come in often demanding medication," says Eric Hassall, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation in San Francisco.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:03 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Hormones And Metabolism Conspire Against Dieters

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:24 pm

There are some fresh insights from Australia that help explain why it's so difficult for dieters to keep off the weight they lose.

Willpower will only take you so far, in case you haven't run that experiment yourself. Turns out our bodies have a fuel gauge, not entirely unlike the gas gauge on our cars, that tell us when it's time to tank up on food.

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The Salt
10:09 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Men Can Be Binge-Eaters, Too

Male binge eaters were more likely to be depressed and obese than men who didn't binge, a study found.

Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 11:20 am

When we think of eating disorders, the classic image is a waif-thin, anorexic woman.

But here's a question for men: Do you find yourself fasting after eating too much? Or maybe pushing through an insanely long run or workout, trying to compensate for overeating through intense exercise?

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The Salt
6:59 am
Sat October 22, 2011

Drinking Whiskey In The Spirit Of George Washington

In a cavernous barn, distillers make whiskey with rye, corn and malted barley.

Melissa Forsyth NPR

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 5:31 am

Virginians have always enjoyed their liquor, and for much of the 18th century, their preferred drink was rum. But when war and tariffs made imported rum hard to come by, George Washington saw an opportunity. Why not make liquor out of grains he was growing on his farms?

"He was a businessman and he was a very, very successful one," says Dennis Pogue, the director of preservation programs at Mount Vernon.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:29 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

IQ Isn't Set In Stone, Suggests Study That Finds Big Jumps, Dips In Teens

Brain researchers say the big fluctuations in IQ performance they found in teens were not random — or a fluke.

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 10:50 am

For as long as there's been an IQ test, there's been controversy over what it measures. Do IQ scores capture a person's intellectual capacity, which supposedly remains stable over time? Or is the Intelligent Quotient exam really an achievement test — similar to the S.A.T. — that's subject to fluctuations in scores?

The findings of a new study add evidence to the latter theory: IQ seems to be a gauge of acquired knowledge that progresses in fits and starts.

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The Salt
4:05 pm
Thu September 22, 2011

Farmers And Ranchers Reach Out To Talk To Consumers

It seems that all the big farm groups - from beef and pork producers to sugar and soybean growers — have been paying attention to those "Know Your Farmer" bumper stickers.

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The Salt
2:30 pm
Wed September 21, 2011

'Biggest Loser' Nudges Many Viewers To Think Thin

Contestants from NBC's "The Biggest Loser" do yoga in Auckland, New Zealand.
TRAE PATTON PR NEWSWIRE

Originally published on Wed September 21, 2011 2:33 pm

Contestants on the Season 12 Premiere of TV's The Biggest Loser last night may not be the only people motivated to lose weight. Viewers are influenced by weight-loss reality shows, too.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:16 pm
Thu September 15, 2011

First Lady Leans On Darden Restaurants To Shave Calories Off Menus

Menus at Olive Garden and Red Lobster are about to get a health makeover. Darden Restaurants, which owns the brands, is the latest corporation to collaborate with First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! campaign aimed ending childhood obesity.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Fatal Car Crashes Drop For 16-Year-Olds, Rise For Older Teens

Richard Meehan, 16, with his car at his home in Shelton, Conn in 2008. Researchers say tougher licensing laws have led to fewer fatal car crashes involving 16-year-old drivers.
Bob Child ASSOCIATED PRESS

Terrified to see your teenager behind the wheel? You're not alone. But a new study finds tougher state licensing laws have led to a decrease in fatal accidents, at least among 16-year-olds. That's the good news.

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Shots - Health Blog
9:15 am
Tue September 6, 2011

Kids Of Parents Who Smoke At Home Miss More School

iStockphoto.com

About half of adult smokers who live with young children say they don't smoke in the house. But that leaves the rest who do.

And the children of these at-home smokers --according to a study just published in the journal Pediatrics — are missing more days of school.

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Food
11:01 pm
Wed August 31, 2011

In Soda Revival, Fizzy Taste Bubbles Up From The Past

Phosphates and bitters, a mixture of herbs steeped in alcohol, are part of the revival of old-timey soda fountain drinks at places like PS7's in Washington, D.C.
Maggie Starbard NPR

If you're hankering for something new to drink — something more interesting than the usual cocktail or soda — you may want to look to the past. Way back in the 19th century, pharmacists and soda-jerks created all sorts of exotic, lip-smacking sensations by mixing fizzy mineral water with unique blends of sweet syrups and bitters.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun August 28, 2011

Simple Things To Do To Lessen Back-To-School Stomach Bugs

Researchers have found that when bottles of sanitizer and wipes were kept around schools and students were cued to use them, they ended up missing significantly fewer days due to stomach bugs.
iStockphoto.com

As kids head back to class the dreaded back-to-school bugs begin to spike. Sniffles and sneezes are inevitable, but there are also stomach bugs.

And parents may never have considered how one part of the morning routine may increase their children's odds of getting an upset stomach. It's the packing of lunch with just typical foods.

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