David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

Pages

Sports
3:00 am
Thu September 29, 2011

Red Sox Shut Out Of Playoffs As Rays Clinch Wild Card

The Tampa Bay Rays rallied from a seven-run deficit Wednesday to beat the New York Yankees and advance to the playoffs. The win shuts out the Boston Red Sox, who lost a close game to the Baltimore Orioles.

Europe
3:00 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Greek Parliament Weighs Property Tax Amid Protests

Originally published on Tue September 27, 2011 7:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, host: And I'm David Greene. Greece's government hopes to approve a new property tax in parliament today. There is wide opposition to the measure from a Greek public that's already feeling the pain from austerity measures. The government says the new tax is a must to prove that the country deserves more international bailout money to prop up the Greek economy. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Athens.

Sylvia, good morning.

Read more
World
9:38 am
Wed September 21, 2011

Two Americans Held In Iran Released On Bail

A million-dollar bail agreement secured the release Wednesday of Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, who had been sentenced to eight-year prison terms for illegal entry and espionage. A third American arrested with them, Sarah Shourd, was released last year. All denied any wrongdoing.

Afghanistan
11:49 am
Tue September 20, 2011

Afghanistan's Former President Rabbani Assassinated

Burhanuddin Rabbani, the head of the Afghan Peace Council and former president of Afghanistan, was killed in a bombing in the nation's capital.

Economy
3:00 am
Mon September 19, 2011

Obama To Propose Deficit Reduction Plan

President Obama today releases his plan to bring down the federal deficit. The proposal will include new taxes, Medicare reductions and savings from troop withdrawals.

Afghanistan
7:26 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Afghan Insurgents Fire On Kabul Neighborhood

Insurgents appear to have launched a coordinated attack in the heart of Afghanistan's capital city. Rocket propelled grenades and assault weapons could be heard across Kabul — targeting the U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters.

Analysis
3:00 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Politics In The News

David Greene talks to NPR's Cokie Roberts about the week in politics.

Africa
3:00 am
Wed September 7, 2011

With Gadhafi Missing, Rebels Move To Secure Libya

Libyan rebels continue to search for Moammar Gadhafi. While his whereabouts are unknown, convoys of Gadhafi loyalists left Libya for neighboring Niger.

Middle East
3:00 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Syrian Opposition Names Transition Council

Syria's opposition movement now has a transitional council similar to the one in Libya that's been working to defeat the regime of Moammar Gadhafi. Things aren't going well for the council in Syria, but some say it's a first step toward coordinating the campaign against the Assad regime.

Crime In The City
11:01 pm
Mon August 29, 2011

Moscow, In A Time Of Fear

Remembering Russia's Dark Past: Tom Rob Smith's crime novels follow Soviet security agent Leo Demidov through 1950s Moscow, when Josef Stalin ruled the Kremlin and simply associating with the wrong people could land you in jail.
And all that Malarkey via Flickr

The novels of Tom Rob Smith are set mostly in the Soviet Union of the 1950s, a time and a place where oppression was palpable and any wrong move could get a person sent to a prison thousands of miles away.

Smith's first thriller, Child 44, was the story of a Soviet security agent whose job was to spy on fellow citizens. While many authors are virtual tour guides in the places where they set their novels, Smith had actually only been to Moscow once before — in 1997, on a high school trip.

Read more

Pages