Linton Weeks

Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

He currently lives in a suburb of Washington with the artist Jan Taylor Weeks. In 2009, they created The Stone and Holt Weeks Foundation to honor their beloved sons.

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U.S.
9:53 am
Tue October 11, 2011

No Nukes: Bringing The Right And Left Together

The type of atomic bomb that was used in Japan in World War II, known as the "Fat Man," shown here in a 1960 photo released by the U.S. government. Liberals and conservatives are gathering at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on Tuesday to call for efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons.

AP

Finally. Something the right and the left can agree on: nuclear disarmament.

On Tuesday, more than 70 notable people from around the world will convene at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif. They will beseech international potentates and personages to seriously work toward eradicating nuclear weaponry from the face of the Earth.

To many observers, the idea of undoing what has been done is like trying to put shaving cream back in the can — or, more to the point, radiation back in the warhead.

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Digital Life
6:33 am
Thu October 6, 2011

Steve Jobs: The Link Between Androids And Humans

In his last public appearance after stepping down as Apple CEO, Steve Jobs introduces Apple's iCloud storage system in San Francisco, June 2011.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:21 am

With his black turtleneck, wire-rimmed glasses and conspiratorial grin, Steve Jobs was arguably the best ambassador ever between androids and humans.

When Jobs died Wednesday at 56 after protracted combat with pancreatic cancer, the world lost a valuable shuttle diplomat between computers and tablets and gadgets and animated robots, and the people who so desperately long to relate to them.

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Politics
9:21 am
Tue October 4, 2011

These Days, Everyone Dares Call It Treason

American turncoat Benedict Arnold persuades Maj. John Andre to conceal papers in his boot and send them to the British to enable them to capture West Point in this print by C.F. Blauvelt and W. Wellstood circa 1785.

Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 12:24 pm

Hurling around a word like "treason," the Chicago Sun-Times has observed, "is the definition of dirty politics."

If that be the case, this particular political season is dirtier than a West Texas hog wallow.

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Politics
11:40 am
Wed September 28, 2011

America's Love Affair With Nationalism

Fans of the Tampa Bay Rays celebrate during the singing of God Bless America during the game against the Boston Red Sox at Tropicana Field on Sept. 11 in St. Petersburg, Fl.
J. Meric Getty Images

Picture this: An alternate-reality, suspended-in-space American metropolis where steampunk contraptions –- like propeller-driven dirigibles, squeaky trolley wires and clunky robotic creatures –- operate against a backdrop of clanging liberty bells, red, white and blue powder kegs and jingoistic posters warning: "Patriots! Arm Thyself Against the Foreigners and Anarchists!"

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Politics
11:59 am
Fri September 23, 2011

Also-Rans: What Drives The Perennial Candidates?

Socialist candidate for the presidency Norman Thomas parades down Wisconsin Avenue in Milwaukee in 1932, where he made a speech.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 3:11 pm

The perennial presidential candidate: Like the Energizer Bunny, he just keeps going and going. Like Old Man River, he keeps on rolling along. And he is held up as a pure example from the high school civics class in which we were taught that in America anyone can run for president.

He is also, like the majority of people who seek office, an also-ran.

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Around the Nation
10:16 am
Wed September 14, 2011

Is Walmart A Magnet For American Mayhem?

In virtually every county, there is a Walmart open every hour of every day and every one of those Walmarts is being visited by 37,000 people a week — that's 220 people an hour, in every Walmart every hour of the day. Here a Walmart worker pulls carts at a store in Pittsburg, Calif. on June 20.
Paul Sakuma AP

Dispatches from the field: A customer was nabbed by police for sampling raw meat at a Walmart in Pennsylvania. A woman said she had an encounter with a bat at a Walmart in Minnesota. A family of five was living in a car at a Walmart in Florida.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
8:00 am
Thu September 8, 2011

After Sept. 11: The Not-So-Brave New World

An Amtrak Police K-9 watches while commuters depart for rush hour during "Operation Railsafe" at Union Station in Washington, D.C., last October.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 6:56 pm

Midmorning on a recent Tuesday in Washington and life is a-bustling at Union Station, the railroad terminal just a few blocks from the U.S. Capitol. People come and go, sidestepping the Jersey barriers at the entrance, making for the platform gates, some talking on cellphones, others to each other, still others moving in purposeful silence.

Not a soul seems to be paying attention to the security signs or videos.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
11:09 am
Tue September 6, 2011

5 Other Surprise Attacks That Changed History

One of the earliest accounts of a surprise attack comes from Greek mythology: the Trojan Horse.
Rischgitz Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The headline writers at USA Today put it this way: "9/11 How One Day Changed Our World." National Geographic observed that the attacks of Sept. 11 would "alter the course of history."

But the shocking assaults in 2001 on the World Trade towers, the Pentagon and the planned hit on the Capitol were not the first surprise attacks that changed the way humans do business.

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