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Melissa Block

As special correspondent, Melissa Block produces richly reported profiles of figures at the forefront of thought and culture, as well as stories and series on the critical issues of our day. Her reporting spans both domestic and international news. In addition, she is a guest host on NPR news programs, and develops podcasts based on her reporting.

Great reporting combined with compelling storytelling is vital to NPR's future. No one exemplifies that blend better than Block. As listeners well know, she has an amazing ability for telling the important stories of our age in a way that engages both the heart and the mind. It is why she has earned such a devoted following throughout her 30-year career at NPR.

As co-host of All Things Considered from 2003 to 2015, Block's reporting took her everywhere from the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina to the heart of Rio de Janeiro; from rural Mozambique to the farthest reaches of Alaska. Her riveting reporting from Sichuan, China, during and after the massive earthquake there in 2008 helped earn NPR broadcast journalism's top honors, including a George Foster Peabody Award, duPont-Columbia Award, Edward R. Murrow Award, National Headliner Award, and the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Block began at NPR in 1985 as an editorial assistant for All Things Considered and rose to become senior producer. From 1994 to 2002, she was a New York reporter and correspondent. Her reporting after the attacks of September 11, 2001, helped earn NPR a Peabody Award.

Here's how I knew I liked Patti Trabosh. It goes back to the very first time I called her out of the blue to ask whether I might profile her family for a story on opioid addiction. The very first words out of her mouth were, "I'm pissed off!" Trabosh went on to explain why she was angry. First, it was the struggle to find a bed in a drug treatment program for her 22-year-old son Nikko Adam. He had become addicted to prescription painkillers and then heroin when he was still in high school. He...

Yesterday, NASA announced that astronaut Scott Kelly will retire from the space agency as of April 1st. Kelly holds the U.S. record for the most time spent in space. For nearly a full year, he zoomed along at 17,500 miles per hour — orbiting 230 miles above earth — on the International Space Station. And for those million or so of us who follow him on Twitter, Cmdr. Kelly's year in space gave us a mind-expanding view of planet Earth. Kelly posted spectacular photos — awesome, in the true...

The epidemic of opioid abuse that's swept the U.S. has left virtually no community unscathed, from big cities to tiny towns. In fact, drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury death in this country: more than gun deaths; more than car crashes. There were more than 47,000 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes unintentional overdoses and suicides. More than half of those were from opioids, including...

When President Obama travels to Cuba next month — the first visit by a sitting U.S. president in nearly 90 years — it will mark a historic step on the path to normalizing relations with the island nation. While Obama is in Havana, two U.S. businessmen are hoping the president might spend some time with them — or even take a seat on a prototype of the tractor they plan to assemble and sell in Cuba. Horace Clemmons of Paint Rock, Ala., and Saul Berenthal of Raleigh, N.C., have just received...

You don't host All Things Considered without having a list of memorable interview moments with musicians, actors and authors. On her last day as host, NPR's Melissa Block takes a look at some of the highlights over her 12 1/2 years as one of the voices of All Things Considered . She recalls the musical voice of a Louisiana shrimp boat captain who rode out Hurricane Katrina on his boat. And her conversation with the computerized voice of the late film critic Roger Ebert, who could no longer...

Editor's note: NPR's Melissa Block was on a reporting trip to southwest China in May 2008 when a massive earthquake hit, leaving some 90,000 dead or missing. Now, as she wraps up her time hosting All Things Considered, she reconnected with a girl, now a young woman, who has overcome great obstacles since that traumatic event. The original version, published in English, is here . 前言;NPR记者Melissa Block曾在2008年的5月全程报道了在中国西南方那场极具毁灭性的地震,有将近90,000人失踪或失去生命。现在,是她在All Things Considered (面面俱到...

Editor's Note: NPR's Melissa Block was on a reporting trip to southwest China in May 2008 when a massive earthquake hit, leaving some 90,000 dead or missing. Now, as she wraps up her time hosting All Things Considered , she reconnected with a girl, now a young woman, who has overcome great obstacles since that traumatic event. You can also see this story in Chinese . One year after the earthquake, I went back to Sichuan Province and met a girl who gave me great hope. Huang Meihua was a feisty...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: The U.S. Postal Service just released its stamp honoring the late poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou. There was a big ceremony yesterday. (APPLAUSE) BLOCK: Oprah was there. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) OPRAH WINFREY: And I'm honored to be here, to stand as her daughter, sister, friend at the unveiling of the Maya forever - forever... (APPLAUSE) WINFREY: Stamp. BLOCK: And it will forever...

Drive down gravel Road 22 in Nebraska's York County, past weathered farmhouses and corn cut to stubble in rich, black loam soil, and you'll find a small barn by the side of the road. Built of native ponderosa pine, the barn is topped with solar panels. A windmill spins furiously out front. Known as the Energy Barn, it's a symbol of renewable energy, standing smack on the proposed route of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline — a project of the energy giant TransCanada. Pipeline...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: Keystone XL - for years now, the pipeline has been tied up in polarizing argument about energy, jobs and the environment. Keystone's been argued in the U.S. Congress, in state court, at protests around the country and on late-night television. (SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE COLBERT REPORT") STEPHEN COLBERT: You're going to sign that, right? PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Obviously, these young people weren't...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: This will not be your average kayaking story. IDA PARKER: I did see the shark grab the kayak and flip it over. CORNISH: That's Ida Parker of Plymouth, Massachusetts. She was out on the water yesterday afternoon off the Plymouth Coast. MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: Parker was in one kayak, her friend was in another. They were hoping to see some seals, and apparently so was the great white shark. PARKER: The...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: More disturbing news today from the extremist group that calls the Islamic State. They claim to have beheaded another American journalist. The group posted a video that appears to show the killing of Steven Sotloff. The White House and State Department say the U.S. government is still working to authentic that video. The State Department's Jen Psaki spoke earlier today. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING...

Regulations passed in Texas, which affected clinics that perform abortions there, were set to go into effect on Sept. 1. On Friday, a federal judge blocked those regulations, on the grounds that they unconstitutionally restricted access to legal abortion. Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: And I'm Robert Siegel. With the end of August comes the traditional beginning of the fall election season. Primaries across the country are wrapping up and while November may seem like a long way off, candidates and political parties are hard at work. So we begin this hour with a look at the election map. BLOCK:...

College athletes scored a major victory in court Friday. A federal judge issued a ruling that the NCAA violated antitrust law by prohibiting athletes from payment for the use of their names, images and likenesses. The ruling addressed football and basketball players in particular. Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: Today, a major legal victory for college athletes and a big defeat for the NCAA. A federal judge has ruled that some NCAA...

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