Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renee Montagne.

Known for his probing questions to presidents, warlords, authors, and musicians, Inskeep has a passion for the stories of the less famous—like an American soldier who lost both feet in Afghanistan; the Bordelons, who remained in their home even when it flooded during Hurricane Katrina; or New Hampshire women at a dining-room table, pondering how to vote.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, Cairo, and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," a series on conflict in Nigeria.

Above all, Inskeep and the rest of the Morning Edition team work daily to, as he puts it, "slow down the news," to make sense of fast-moving events and focus on the real people affected.

A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and Michele Norris, host of NPR's All Things Considered, conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

A veteran of public and commercial radio stations in and around New York, Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush.

After the September 11, 2001 attacks, Inskeep covered the war in Afghanistan, the hunt for al-Qaeda suspects in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq for NPR. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid that went wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of the NPR News team that was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for its coverage of Iraq.

On days filled with bad news, Inskeep is often inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, published in 2011 by The Penguin Press, a story of ordinary, often heroic people and their struggles to build one of the world's great megacities. In addition, Inskeep has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. He has been a guest on TV programs including MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports and the PBS Newhour.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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NPR Story
11:06 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Netflix Backpedals On Qwikster Service

The company says it is scuttling its plan to split off its DVD-by mail and streaming video services.

Economy
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Nobel Prize For Economics To Be Announced

Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics. They won for their research on macroeconomics.

Middle East
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Egypt's Military Clashes With Coptic Christians

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 11:22 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Violence in Cairo over the weekend reminds us that Egypt is mostly Muslim but not entirely so. Several million Egyptians are Coptic Christians. And it was members of that minority group who clashed with Egypt's military or the weekend. At least two dozen people are dead, hundreds wounded, the worst violence since Hosni Mubarak was driven from power in February.

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NPR Story
6:55 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Details Emerge After Reports Of Awlaki's Death

Yemeni officials are saying Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen, was killed while traveling between two provinces in Yemen. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston about reports of the death of Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen.

Europe
3:00 am
Fri September 30, 2011

International Debt Inspectors Return To Greece

In Greece, financial inspectors returned Thursday to review whether the government was complying with the terms of a $150 billion bailout that it agreed to last year. But the inspectors were met with loud demonstrations protesting further wage and pension cuts, public sector layoffs and higher taxes.

Afghanistan
7:14 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Afghan Insurgents Launch Multiple Attacks In Kabul

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 7:47 am

The Taliban is claiming responsibility for gunfire and explosions heard around the Afghan capital Kabul. Insurgents have been firing in the direction of the U.S. Embassy as well as other landmarks.

Afghanistan
5:30 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Rockets Fired At U.S. Embassy In Kabul

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 7:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

President Obama left behind the debate in Washington yesterday to campaign for his jobs bill, which includes money to upgrade infrastructure. He visited the Brent Spence Bridge in Cincinnati, which is considered obsolete. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

ARI SHAPIRO: Gerardo Claudio lives in Augusta, Georgia, and works all over the country. He spends about three weeks out of every month on the road, which gives him a good look at the nation's infrastructure.

GERARDO CLAUDIO: The roads are in real, real awful condition, should I say.

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Afghanistan
3:00 am
Mon September 12, 2011

77 U.S. Troops Injured In Afghan Truck Bomb

Late Saturday night, a Taliban truck bomb ripped through a military base in eastern Afghanistan, injuring 77 U.S. troops. It also sent shrapnel up to a mile away, killing an Afghan policeman and four civilians.

Africa
3:00 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Mubarak Trial Resumes In Egypt

The trial of ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resumed in Cairo Wednesday. On orders from the judge, cameras and recording equipment will no longer be allowed in the courtroom. Witnesses for the prosecution have said Mubarak did not give orders to shoot protesters.

Africa
7:08 am
Tue September 6, 2011

Libyan Rebels Block Gadhafi Stronghold Bani Walid

The town of Bani Walid is the latest location of a front line in the war to capture the final strongholds of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. Over the weekend, efforts to negotiate the town's surrender broke down. The talks have resumed, even as rebels threaten to attack.

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