KETR

Steve Inskeep

In Greece, financial inspectors returned Thursday to review whether the government was complying with the terms of a $150 billion bailout that it agreed to last year. But the inspectors were met with loud demonstrations protesting further wage and pension cuts, public sector layoffs and higher taxes.

The Taliban is claiming responsibility for gunfire and explosions heard around the Afghan capital Kabul. Insurgents have been firing in the direction of the U.S. Embassy as well as other landmarks.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

President Obama left behind the debate in Washington yesterday to campaign for his jobs bill, which includes money to upgrade infrastructure. He visited the Brent Spence Bridge in Cincinnati, which is considered obsolete. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

ARI SHAPIRO: Gerardo Claudio lives in Augusta, Georgia, and works all over the country. He spends about three weeks out of every month on the road, which gives him a good look at the nation's infrastructure.

GERARDO CLAUDIO: The roads are in real, real awful condition, should I say.

Late Saturday night, a Taliban truck bomb ripped through a military base in eastern Afghanistan, injuring 77 U.S. troops. It also sent shrapnel up to a mile away, killing an Afghan policeman and four civilians.

The trial of ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resumed in Cairo Wednesday. On orders from the judge, cameras and recording equipment will no longer be allowed in the courtroom. Witnesses for the prosecution have said Mubarak did not give orders to shoot protesters.

The town of Bani Walid is the latest location of a front line in the war to capture the final strongholds of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. Over the weekend, efforts to negotiate the town's surrender broke down. The talks have resumed, even as rebels threaten to attack.

The latest batch of high-tech alarm clocks explode, roll away, fly away and even make you solve math problems to keep you from oversleeping.

Asian Markets Tumble

Sep 5, 2011

Stock exchanges across Asia dropped sharply Monday after Friday's dismal U.S. employment report showing no new jobs were added in August. Japan's Nikkei index fell nearly 2 percent — with markets in South Korea, Hong Kong and Shanghai also posting major losses. Investors remain concerned by the possibility of another recession in the U.S., where markets are closed Monday for Labor Day.

The Labor Department reported Friday that the nation's jobless rate remained unchanged at 9.1 percent in August, as employers added no new workers.

Communities on the East Coast planned for hurricane Irene with help from analysts at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA forecasters use data from federally-funded weather satellites to predict storms. One of those satellite programs is facing deep cuts in the latest round of congressional belt-tightening.

Many of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's family members have turned up in Algeria. It's not known if Gadhafi is with them. The Algerian Foreign Ministry said in a statement that Gadhafi's wife Safia, his sons Hannibal and Mohammed, and his daughter Aisha entered the country across the land border.

Major storms like Hurricane Irene often bring with them political consequences. Over the last few days, politicians from the president on down to local mayors, have been showing up on the airwaves.

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DAVID GREENE, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning Im David Greene. Renee Montagne is on assignment in Afghanistan.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And Im Steve Inskeep.

The nation's largest city works to return to business today after the flooding from Irene.

GREENE: New York took a direct hit from the storm. The destruction was not as awful in New York as some feared. Still, this is a metropolitan area of more than 19 million people.

On a recent morning, John Pierce walked across the sprawling hospital campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. On the lawn, he spotted people who have come to define the place in recent years.

"[They were] having physical fitness-type tests," Pierce says. "There were people with notebooks and things, like they record when you do your sit-ups and pushups — but these were a number of double amputees."

Pierce is the historian for the Walter Reed Society, which makes him an expert on the historic American hospital in Washington, D.C.

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