Tomorrow's Water Today
7:40 am
Mon August 25, 2014

Lake levels: Cooper low, Cypress Springs high

Lake Cypress Springs is at over 90 percent of capacity.
Lake Cypress Springs is at over 90 percent of capacity.
Credit provided image

This week, we’re doing something a little different – instead of talking about proposed lakes, we’re taking a look at existing ones. Labor Day weekend is coming up, so what better time to check levels at lakes around the region.

OK, bad news first – Cooper Lake is low. It’s at about 45 percent of capacity. It’s the lowest lake in Northeast Texas this summer. So maybe it’s not as majestic as it might be from a scenery standpoint, but the Cooper Lake State Park website says that catfishing and bass fishing is currently excellent at the park, so perhaps anglers shouldn’t let that 45 percent mark deter them from a visit.

To the south lies Lake Tawakoni, which is just shy of two-thirds full – it’s at about 62 percent of capacity. Its eastern neighbor, Lake Fork, is doing better, at about 82 percent of capacity.

Over toward the Dallas area are the twin reservoirs that are the unofficial gateways to Northeast Texas – Lavon Lake and Lake Ray Hubbard. Lavon’s not doing real well, as anyone who’s driven to McKinney on U.S. Hwy. 380 recently can tell you. Lavon is at about 51 percent capacity. Its suburban counterpart, Lake Ray Hubbard is doing a bit better – 65 percent of capacity.

To the north, little Lake Bonham is almost exactly three-quarters full, at about 74 percent of capacity. Both reservoirs in the Paris area are doing well. Pat Mayse Lake sits at about 83 percent full, while the smaller Lake Crook is at 99 percent of capacity. Another small municipal reservoir, Lake Sulphur Springs is also high, at 93 percent. Heading east along Interstate 30 and rounding out our review of the region – Lake Cypress Springs, Monticello Reservoir and Lake Bob Sandlin are all at over 90 percent of capacity. And as for our neighbors in the Ark-La-Tex, Lake o’ the Pines is 95 percent full, Caddo Lake is at 81 percent and Wright Patman lake is 100 percent full.

All data are from the Texas Water Development Board’s Aug. 24 readings.