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NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Most Reliable Cars: Toyota At Top; Jaguar At Bottom

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 6:49 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Consumer Reports has come out with its ranking of car reliability. Toyota's Scion brand topped the list. Luxury carmaker Jaguar was at the bottom. Chrysler was rated most improved. NPR's Sonari Glinton has more.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Okay, here's the Consumer Reports top 10 list: Scion, Lexus, Acura, Mazda, Honda, Toyota, Infiniti, Subaru, Nissan and Volvo. Not one American car brand.

DAVID CHAMPION: I think the fortunes have changed for the Big Three, in some ways.

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Strange News
5:42 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Savory Cotton Candy Wins Caesar Salad Award

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 5:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of an unusual winning entry in Houston's annual Caesar salad competition. Best Presentation went to a Caesar salad cotton candy. As the Houston Press reports, the cotton candy was spun onto a cone made of romaine lettuce. Shredded parmesan cheese and black pepper were woven into the candy's pink fibers. It's not the most surprising entry. Last year's event included Caesar salad cupcakes and Caesar sorbet. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:35 am
Tue October 25, 2011

How To Get Rid Of Invasive Snakehead? Eat It

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: Good morning. I'm Ari Shapiro.

Here's one way to get rid of an invasive species - eat it. The snakehead fish arrived in Washington almost a decade ago. It's a scary looking marine predator that can even slither over land. In Asia, snakeheads are a delicacy, so tonight in Maryland a group of celebrity chefs will prepare the fish to appeal to American palates. One chef deep fries snakehead nuggets for a dish he calls frankenfish tacos. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Author Interviews
4:14 am
Tue October 25, 2011

'El Narco': The Trade Driving Mexico's Drug War

Bloomsbury Press

Over the last five years, the Mexican drug war has claimed the lives of an estimated 40,000 civilians and drug traffickers. British journalist Ioan Grillo describes it as "a bloodbath that has shocked the world."

In his new book, El Narco, Grillo takes a close look at the Mexican drug trade, starting with the term el narco, which has come to represent the vast, often faceless criminal network of drug smugglers who cast a murderous shadow over the entire country.

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Business News

Renee Montagne has this morning's business news.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Steering The Eurozone Through A Rising Storm

On Nov. 1, the European Central Bank will have a new president. Mario Draghi, currently head of Italy's Central Bank, is an American-educated economist with impeccable international credentials. But little is known about the man who will be called on to steer the central bank through the rising Eurozone storm.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Last Word In Business

Ari Shapiro has today's Last Word in business.

Author Interviews
2:31 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

New Bio Quotes Jobs On God, Gates And Great Design

Ever since Steve Jobs died on Oct. 5, much has been written but little revealed about a man who was the face of an iconic American company. But now comes the official biography, published less than three weeks after the death of the Apple co-founder. Over the course of two years and 40 interviews, biographer Walter Isaacson had unique access to Jobs, right up until Jobs' death at age 56.

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Sports
7:13 am
Mon October 24, 2011

Sheep Named After Rugby Star Predicts World Cup Win

Transcript

Business
6:58 am
Mon October 24, 2011

School Turns Trash Into Cash

A school in Flint, Mich., gathered tens of thousands of potato chip bags, juice boxes and other lunchtime trash, then sold it all to Terracycle, a company that turns the packaging into bags and placemats. The school made almost $500 dollars.

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