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NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Assassination Galvanizes Syria's Kurdish Minority

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 11:22 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An eruption of anger inside Syria at the assassination of a leading Kurdish politician is reverberating along the Turkish-Syria border. More than 7,500 Syrians are already sheltering in camps in Turkey. Now that Turkey is about to announce new sanctions against Syria, it's worried about a fresh wave of migration if violence continues to escalate.

NPR's Peter Kenyon has this report from Turkey's Hatay Province near the Syrian border.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHILDREN PLAYING)

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Ancient Roman Sculpture Rejoined At Turkish Museum

Two halves of an ancient Greek statue have been reunited and are on display in a Turkish museum. The top half spent the last two decades in the Boston Fine Arts Museum. Turkish officials said it was illegally removed from an archaeological site in southwestern Turkey and they spent years trying to get it back.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

Economy
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Nobel Prize For Economics To Be Announced

Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics. They won for their research on macroeconomics.

Race
3:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Young Hispanics To Continue Shaping U.S. Landscape

Renee Montagne talks to sociologist Ruben Rumbaut, co-author of a landmark longitudinal study of children of immigrants, about whether young Latinos are truly bicultural.

Music Interviews
1:44 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Bjork's 'Biophilia': Interactive Music, Pushing Boundaries

Bjork's new album, Biophilia, is also an interactive multimedia project.

Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin

The title of Bjork's new album came to her after she read a book by neurologist Oliver Sachs about the mind's empathy for music.

"He called it 'musicophilia,' she says. "Obviously, I make music, but I wanted to do a project about nature. So I thought, if I call it Biophilia, it's sort of empathy with nature."

So there are song titles like "Solstice," "Dark Matter" and "Crystalline." The lyrics actually touch on processes in nature — for instance, how crystals grow.

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Around the Nation
6:10 am
Fri October 7, 2011

'Life-Like' Polamalu Frightens Wax Museum Fans

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 9:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

If you don't already find wax museums a bit creepy, this might convince you. NFL star Troy Polamalu is famous for his long, black curls. And it's quite plausible he would be among the lifelike statues in Hollywood's Madam Tussauds. So when visitors sidled up for a souvenir photo with the wax figure in a Steelers jersey, they got a shock. It was alive. It was Polamalu in the flesh shooting a commercial and playing a prank. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:01 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Rural Western Pennsylvania Bridge Goes Missing

The bridge was stolen sometime between Sept. 27 and Oct. 5. Police suspect thieves dismantled it to sell as scrap metal. It was made of corrugated steel valued at about $100,000.

National Security
3:29 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Partisan Divide On National Security Shrinks

GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney travels to the Citadel in South Carolina to deliver a speech on national security Friday. The issue has traditionally been a bright line between hawks and doves, Republicans and Democrats. But even on this, the third anniversary of President Obama winning the Nobel Peace Prize, the politics are no longer clear cut.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Fri October 7, 2011

Pakistani Doctor Who Helped CIA May Face Treason Trial

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 9:55 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Steve Inskeep is away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

When the U.S. tracked down and killed Osama bin Laden in his hiding place in northwest Pakistan, it chose to keep the Pakistani army and its intelligence service in the dark about that mission. The fact that Pakistan was caught with the world's most wanted man living within walking distance of a premiere military academy humiliated and angered many in the country.

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