Dr. Kent Montgomery

Texas A&M University-Commerce
Texas A&M University-Commerce

Texas A&M University-Commerce astronomy professor and director of the University Planetarium, Dr. Kent Montgomery, reflects on news that astronomers in Australia have detected "in the act" a mysterious "fast radio burst" coming from deep in space.  It was the 17th such FRB detected but the first recorded as it was happening in real time.

Maxwell Hamilton, Flickr, Creative Commons
Maxwell Hamilton, Flickr, Creative Commons

Dr. Kent Montgomery, associate professor of astronomy and the director of the Texas A&M University-Commerce Planetarium, says the announcement last week that scientists have detected gravitational waves hypothesized by Albert Einstein 100 years ago represents a major leap forward in astronomy.  He says being able to detect the waves will contribute to our understanding of the beginnings of the universe.

Independent.co.uk
Independent.co.uk

Dr. Kent Montgomery, associate professor and director of the Planetarium at Texas A&M University-Commerce, says he is skeptical of research published by two Cal Tech professors that posits the existence of "Planet 9" on the distant outskirts of our solar system.  Dr.

popsci.com
popsci.com

Texas A&M University-Commerce professor of astronomy and the director of the University Planetarium, Dr. Kent Montgomery, says the new photos of Pluto from the New Horizons mission will give us new clues to the origin of the Universe.  Dr. Montgomery says Pluto is no longer consider a planet because if it was, many other bodies would have to be considered planets, too.

Texas A&M University-Commerce

Texas A&M University-Commerce associate professor of astronomy and the director of the University Planetarium, Dr. Kent Montgomery, discusses the 1977 event when the "Big Ear" radio telescope in Ohio picked up the strongest ever signal from an unknown source in space, lasting more than 70 seconds.

Texas A&M University-Commerce

Dr. Kent Montgomery, associate professor of astronomy and director of the Texas A&M University-Commerce Planetarium, says a total lunar eclipse occurs between 4 and 5 a.m. Wednesday morning, and those who'd like to get a good view of it are welcome at the A&M-Commerce observatory on County Road 4208, just east of Highway 50, south of Commerce.  Also, current Friday night shows at the Planetarium are "Exploding Universe" and "Perfect Little Planet."

Texas A&M University-Commerce

Texas A&M University-Commerce associate professor of astronomy and the director of the University Planetarium, Dr.

Violent Universe showing at A&M-Commerce planetarium

Jan 30, 2012

COMMERCE - Beginning Friday, February 3, the Texas A&M University-Commerce Planetarium will begin showing  “Violent Universe,” which will be offered at 8 p.m. every Friday night through April 13.