Tomorrow's Water Today

provided image / wetlandcenter.com

The natural filtering processes that occur in wetlands can help water utilities make used water clean once again. KETR spoke with Loretta Mokry, an environmental scientist with Fort Worth-based Alan Plummer Associates, who describes how the Tarrant Regional Water District implemented a "constructed wetlands" program.

provided image

This week, we’re doing something a little different – instead of talking about proposed lakes, we’re taking a look at existing ones. Labor Day weekend is coming up, so what better time to check levels at lakes around the region.

TCEQ

The Texas Water Development Board is responsible for writing the state water plan. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality issues permits for new projects. Typically, it's the TCEQ that evaluates the possible merits and damages caused by new development. But what happens when the Texas Water Development Board's planning regions can't agree? Does the TWDB then shift into a mode of evaluating harm and benefits? Board spokesman Andy Saenz says that the role of the board is, well, fluid. The Texas Legislature might continue to tweak the process in the upcoming session.

TWDB

Dramatic moments in public water policy planning aren’t too common. But there actually was such a moment in Texas water policy last week. It involved the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir, which if built, would flood about 70,000 acres north of Mount Pleasant.

KETR

Supporters of the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir encountered a speed bump in Austin this morning, while opponents of the project welcomed a delay of the Texas Water Development Board's final recommendation. 

Audio transcript

Texas Water Development Board

If the proposed Marvin Nichols reservoir is built along the Sulphur River, then not only would some land need to be flooded, but comparable lands must also be set aside to mitigate the environmental damage caused by flooding about 70,000 acres of bottomland hardwood forest.

Since the Dallas area would receive most of the water delivered by the new lake, it's been suggested that the Dallas area - represented in the state water system by Region C - provide a share of the "mitigated" land that's proportional to the region's water use.

NPR

Last year, Texas voters approved the allocation of $2 billion from the state’s rainy day fund to pay for water projects. Proposition 6 won fairly handily, but many from both the left and the right sides of the political spectrum had concerns about the new water fund. Transparency and accountability were mentioned. And even supporters of the measure cautioned against over-investing in certain types of projects.

KETR's weekly water news series "Tomorrow's Water Today" is on a summer hiatus and will return on Mon. July 21.

provided image

Van Zandt county retired businessman Bob Hall rode a wave of Tea Party support to defeat longtime state Senator Bob Deuell in a Republican Party primary runoff last month. Having won the GOP nomination, Hall is considered a safe bet to win the general election in November. 

NPR

Northeast Texas Municipal Water District administrator Walt Sears discusses the three hurdles that any new reservoir in Texas must clear. A project must first be included in the state water plan, which is published by the Texas Water Development Board. Then, another state agency, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, must issue permits for the project. Finally, the new reservoir must receive federal approval.

Sears also mentions that Sen. Kevin Eltife, an East Texan, serves on the new legislative oversight committee set up to assist the Texas Water Development Board. 

Northeast Texas Municipal Water District

The fate of the Marvin Nichols Reservoir proposal - at least insofar as it figures into the Texas Water Development Board's plans - now lies in the hands of that agency's three-person governing body, consisting of chairman Carlos Rubinstein, Bech Bruun and Kathleen Jackson. 

TWDB

It’s going to be a busy week for the Marvin Nichols Reservoir proposal. The Texas Water Development Board is in the process of resolving a conflict between two regional planning groups over the idea. The Northeast Texas group doesn’t want there to be a new, 70,000 acre lake along the Sulphur River north of Mount Pleasant. The North Texas group is in favor of the proposal. 

  The mayor of Mount Pleasant, Paul Meriwether, and the mayor of Mount Vernon, Margaret Sears, both support the proposal to build the Marvin Nichols Reservoir in Northeast Texas. Meriwether and Sears addressed the public at a forum on the issue hosted by the Texas Water Development Board and held in Mount Pleasant on Apr. 29.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The testimonials have been given and now the waiting begins. The Texas Water Development Board’s public commentary period on the Marvin Nichols Reservoir proposal ended May 2. 

Texas Parks and Wildlife

After over a decade of public discussion and commentary, the Texas Water Development Board should be coming to a decision on the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir soon. The public commentary period ends 5 p.m. Friday, May 2. The board is accepting emailed and written comments.

Pages